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    • Dollar coin (United States) - Wikipedia
      • From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia The dollar coin is a United States coin with a face value of one United States dollar. It is the second largest U.S. coin currently minted for circulation in terms of physical size, with a diameter of 1.043 inches (26.5 millimeters) and a thickness of 0.079 in (2.0 mm), coming second to the half dollar.
      en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dollar_coin_(United_States)#:~:text=From%20Wikipedia%2C%20the%20free%20encyclopedia%20The%20dollar%20coin,%282.0%20mm%29%2C%20coming%20second%20to%20the%20half%20dollar.
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  2. United States dollar - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/United_States_dollar

    The United States dollar (symbol: $; code: USD; also abbreviated US$ to distinguish it from other dollar-denominated currencies; referred to as the dollar, U.S. dollar, or American dollar) is the official currency of the United States and its territories per the Coinage Act of 1792.

    • April 2, 1792
    • $, US$, U$
  3. Dollar coin (United States) - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dollar_coin_(United_States)

    The dollar coin is a United States coin with a face value of one United States dollar. It is the second largest U.S. coin currently minted for circulation in terms of physical size, with a diameter of 1.043 inches and a thickness of 0.079 in, coming second to the half dollar. Dollar coins have been minted in the United States in gold, silver, and base metal versions. Dollar coins were first minted in the United States in 1794. While true gold dollars are no longer minted, the Sacagawea, Presiden

    • 26.5 mm (1.043 in)
    • 8.100 (2000–) g (0.260 troy oz)
  4. United States dollar - Simple English Wikipedia, the free ...

    simple.wikipedia.org/wiki/United_States_dollar

    The United States dollar, or the American dollar, is the official currency, or money, of the United States of America and is also used in a number of other countries outside the US. It is also the standard currency for international markets selling goods such as gold and oil (petrol).

  5. History of the United States dollar - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/History_of_the_United...
    • Overview
    • Background
    • Early history
    • Gold standard
    • Silver standard
    • Use as international reserve currency

    The history of the United States Dollar refers to more than 240 years since the Continental Congress of the United States authorized the issuance of Continental Currency in 1775. On April 2, 1792, the United States Congress created the United States dollar as the country's standard unit of money. The term dollar had already been in common usage since the colonial period when it referred to eight-real coin used by the Spanish throughout New Spain.

    After the American Revolutionary War began in 1775, the Continental Congress began issuing paper money known as Continental currency, or Continentals. Continental currency was denominated in dollars from $ 1⁄6 to $80, including many odd denominations in between. During the Revolution, Congress issued $241,552,780 in Continental currency. By the end of 1778, this Continental currency retained only between 1⁄5 to 1⁄7 of its original face value. By 1780, Continental bills – or ...

    After the creation of the U.S. dollar, the fledgling American administration of President George Washington turned its attention to monetary issues again in the early 1790s, under the leadership of Alexander Hamilton, the Secretary of the Treasury at the time. Congress acted on Hamilton's recommendations, with the Coinage Act of 1792 that established the dollar as the basic unit of account for the United States. The word dollar is derived from Low Saxon cognate of the High German Thaler. The mos

    Note: all references to 'ounce' in this section are to the troy ounce as used for precious metals, rather than to the avoirdupois ounce used in the United States customary units system for other goods. A gold-standard 1928 one-dollar bill. It is identified as a "United States Note" rather than a Federal Reserve note and by the words "Will Pay to the Bearer on Demand", which do not appear on today's currency. This clause became obsolete in 1933 but remained on new notes for 30 years thereafter. B

    United States silver certificates were a type of representative money printed from 1878 to 1964 in the United States as part of its circulation of paper currency. They were produced in response to silver agitation by citizens who were angered by the Fourth Coinage Act, and were used alongside the gold-based dollar notes. The silver certificates were initially redeemable in the same face value of silver dollar coins, and later in raw silver bullion. Since the early 1920s, silver certificates were

    World War II devastated European and Asian economies while leaving the United States' economy relatively unharmed. As European governments exhausted their gold reserves and borrowed to pay the United States for war material, the United States accumulated large gold reserves. This

    The United States enjoys some benefits because the dollar serves as the international reserve currency. The United States is less likely to face a balance of payments crisis.

  6. Coins of the United States dollar - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Coins_of_the_United_States...
    • Overview
    • Current coinage
    • Obsolete and canceled coins
    • Mill coins

    Coins of the United States dollar were first minted in 1792. New coins have been produced annually and they make up a valuable aspect of the United States currency system. Today, circulating coins exist in denominations of 1¢, 5¢, 10¢, 25¢, 50¢, and $1.00. Also minted are bullion and commemorative coins. All of these are produced by the United States Mint. The coins are then sold to Federal Reserve Banks which in turn are responsible for putting coins into circulation and withdrawing...

    Today, four mints operate in the United States producing billions of coins each year. The main mint is the Philadelphia Mint, which produces circulating coinage, mint sets and some commemorative coins. The Denver Mint also produces circulating coinage, mint sets and commemoratives. The San Francisco Mint produces regular and silver proof coinage, and produced circulating coinage until the 1970s. The West Point Mint produces bullion coinage. Philadelphia and Denver produce the dies used at all of

    Note: It is a common misconception that "eagle"-based nomenclature for gold U.S. coinage was merely slang. The "eagle," "half-eagle" and "quarter-eagle" were specifically given these names in the Coinage Act of 1792. Likewise, the double eagle was specifically created as such by name. Some modern commemorative coins have been minted in the silver dollar, half-eagle and eagle denominations. See also US coin sizes, showing all major U.S. coin series and scaled images in a single chart. The law gov

    Although the term mill was defined in the eighteenth century as 1⁄1,000 of a dollar or 0.1¢, no coin smaller than 0.5¢ has ever been officially minted in the U.S. However, unofficial mill coins, also called "tenth cent" or "tax-help coins", made of diverse materials—plastic, wood, tin, and others—were produced as late as the 1960s by some states, localities, and private businesses for tax payments and to render change for small purchases.

  7. United States dollar - Wikipedia

    hif.wikipedia.org/wiki/United_States_dollar

    United States dollar, nai to American dollar, United States of America ke official currency hae. Likhe ke time American dollar ke ($) symbol ke kaam me laae ke likha jaawe hae. Dollar ke USD (U.S. Dollar) ke naam se bhi jaana jaawe hae.

  8. United States one-dollar bill - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/United_States_one-dollar_bill
    • Overview
    • History
    • Obverse of current $1 bill
    • Reverse of current $1 bill
    • Collecting Federal Reserve dollar bills
    • Prosecution for the possession of a $1 bill

    The United States one-dollar bill since 1876 has been the lowest value denomination of United States paper currency. An image of the first U.S. President, George Washington, based on the Athenaeum Portrait, a 1796 painting by Gilbert Stuart, is currently featured on the obverse, and the Great Seal of the United States is featured on the reverse. The one-dollar bill has the oldest overall design of all U.S. currency currently being produced. The obverse design of the dollar bill seen today debute

    1. 1862: The first one-dollar bill was issued as a Legal Tender Note with a portrait of Salmon P. Chase, the Secretary of the Treasury under President Abraham Lincoln. 2. 1869: The $1 United States Note was redesigned with a portrait of George Washington in the center and a vigne

    In 1928, all currency was changed to the size which is familiar today. The first one-dollar bills were issued as silver certificates under Series of 1928. The Treasury seal and serial numbers were dark blue. The obverse was nearly identical to the Series of 1923 $1 silver certifi

    The portrait of George Washington is displayed in the center of the obverse of the one-dollar bill, as it has been since the 1869 design. The oval containing George Washington is propped up by bunches of bay laurel leaves. To the left of George Washington is the Federal Reserve District seal. The name of the Federal Reserve Bank that issued the note encircles a capital letter, identifying it among the twelve Federal Reserve Banks. The sequential number of the bank is also displayed in the four c

    The reverse of the one-dollar bill has an ornate design that incorporates both sides of the Great Seal of the United States to the left and right of the word ONE. This word appears prominently in the white space at the center of the bill in a capitalized, shadowed, and seriffed typeface. A smaller image of the word "ONE" is superimposed over the numeral "1" in each of the four corners of the bill. "THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA" spans the top of the bill, "ONE DOLLAR" is emblazoned along the bott

    Except for significant errors, and series 1988A web notes printed in small batches for some of the Federal Reserve districts, green seal dollars are of little collector value. However, two notes have generated public interest, although neither is scarce. In 1963 dollar bills were produced for the Eleventh Federal Reserve District, headquartered in Dallas. Since the FRD jurisdictions are sequentially numbered, notes received the corresponding letter "K", for the 11th letter of the alphabet. Some

    In Turkey the possession of a one-dollar bill can lead to a prosecution and sentence for terror related charges because it is seen as evidence for being a member of the Gülen Movement founded by Fethullah Gülen, which is seen as a terror organization in Turkey. Turkish authorities believe that Gülen used to present a one dollar bill to his followers and that they showed it to one another in order to make them recognizable.

    • 2.61 inches ≈ 66.3 mm
    • Approx. 1 g
    • $1
    • 6.14 inches ≈ 156.1 mm
  9. United States two-dollar bill - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/United_States_two-dollar_bill
    • Overview
    • Denomination overview
    • Rarity
    • History
    • Visual chronology
    • Usage

    The United States two-dollar bill is a current denomination of United States currency. A portrait of Thomas Jefferson, the third President of the United States, is featured on the obverse of the note. The reverse features an engraving of the painting Declaration of Independence by John Trumbull. Throughout the $2 bill's pre-1929 life as a large-sized note, it was issued as a United States Note, National Bank Note, silver certificate, Treasury or "Coin" Note and Federal Reserve Bank Note. When U.

    The denomination of two dollars was authorized under a congressional act, and first issued in March 1862. The denomination was continuously used until 1966; by this time the United States Note was the only remaining class of U.S. currency the two-dollar bill was assigned to. In August 1966, the Treasury Department discontinued production of the $2 and $5 denominations of United States Notes. While the $5 denomination had long been issued simultaneously as both a Federal Reserve Note and United S

    Printing $2 bills is twice as cost-effective for the government as printing $1 bills, since they both cost the same amount to manufacture, but the public has not circulated them as widely. During the Great Depression, few Americans had enough money to require $2 bills. In the middle of the 20th century, $2 bills were often used for betting on horse racing, tips at strip clubs and for bribery when politicians wanted votes, and so acquired a negative reputation. During World War II and later, Serv

    In March 1862, the first $2 bill was issued as a Legal Tender Note with a portrait of Alexander Hamilton; the portrait of Hamilton used was a profile view, different from the familiar portrait in use on the small-sized $10 bill since 1928. By 1869, the $2 United States Note was r

    1928–1966 In 1928, when all U.S. currency was changed to its current size, the $2 bill was issued only as a United States Note. The obverse featured a cropped version of Thomas Jefferson's portrait that had been on previous $2 bills. The reverse featured Jefferson's home ...

    A chronological display of the American two-dollar bill.

    Because $2 bills are uncommon in daily use, their use can make a particular group of spenders visible. A documented case of using two-dollar bills to send a message to a community is the case of Geneva Steel and the communities in the surrounding Utah County. In 1989, Geneva Steel paid its employee bonuses in $2 bills. When the bills began to appear in different places, people recognized the importance of the company to the local economy. Use of the $2 bill is also being suggested by some gun ri

    • 2 39/64 inches ≅ 66.3 mm
    • Approx. 1 g
    • $2.00
    • 6 9/64 inches ≅ 156 mm
  10. United States - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/United_States

    The United States of America (USA), commonly known as the United States (US or U.S.) or America, is a country primarily located in central North America, between Canada and Mexico. It consists of 50 states , a federal district , five self-governing territories , and several other island possessions .

  11. The land area of the contiguous United States is 2,959,064 square miles (7,663,941 km 2).Alaska, separated from the contiguous United States by Canada, is the largest state at 663,268 square miles (1,717,856 km 2).