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    • Korean language - Wikipedia
      • The Korean language ( South Korean: 한국어 / 韓國語 hanguk-eo; North Korean: 조선말 / 朝鮮말 chosŏn-mal) is an East Asian language spoken by about 77 million people. It is a member of the Koreanic language family and is the official and national language of both Koreas: North Korea and South Korea,...
      en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Korean_Language#:~:text=The Korean language ( South Korean: 한국어 /,of both Koreas: North Korea and South Korea,
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  2. Korean language - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Korean_language

    Korean (South Korean: 한국어 / 韓國語 hangugeo; North Korean: 조선말 / 朝鮮말 chosŏnmal) is an East Asian language spoken by about 77 million people. It is the official and national language of both Koreas: North Korea and South Korea, with different standardized official forms used in each country.

    • Old Korean

      Old Korean is generally defined as the ancient Koreanic...

    • Primorsky Krai

      Primorsky Krai (Russian: Приморский край, tr. Primorsky...

  3. The Korean language is spoken mainly in North and South Korea. It is spoken by more than 78 million people (most are North or South Koreans). In South Korea, it is called hangukmal (한국말) or hangugeo (Hangeul: 한국어, Hanja: 韓國語). In North Korea, however, it is called choseonmal (조선말) or choseoneo (조선어, 朝鮮語 ...

  4. Outline of Korean language - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Outline_of_Korean_language

    The following outline is provided as an overview of and topical guide to Korean language: . The Korean language is an East Asian language spoken by about 80 million people. It is a member of the Koreanic language family and is the official and national language of both Koreas: North Korea and South Korea, with different standardized official forms used in each country.

  5. Koreanic languages - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Proto-Korean_language
    • Overview
    • Extant languages
    • Proto-language
    • Typology and areal features
    • Proposed external relationships
    • Early history

    Koreanic is a compact language family consisting of Korean and the language of Jeju Island. The latter is often described as a dialect of Korean, but is distinct enough to be considered a separate language. A few scholars suggest that the Yukchin dialect of the far northeast should be similarly distinguished. Korean is richly documented since the introduction of the Hangul alphabet in the 15th century. Earlier renditions of Korean using Chinese characters are much more difficult to interpret. Al

    The various forms of Korean are conventionally described as "dialects" of a single Korean language, but breaks in intelligibility justify viewing them as a small family or two or three languages.

    Koreanic is a relatively shallow language family. Modern varieties show limited variation, most of which can be treated as derived from Late Middle Korean. The few exceptions indicate a date of divergence only a few centuries earlier, following the unification of the peninsula by Silla. It is possible to reach further back using internal reconstruction from Middle Korean. This has been supplemented with philological analysis of the fragmentary records of Old Korean.

    Modern Koreanic varieties have a three-way contrast between plain, aspirated and reinforced stops and affricates, but Proto-Korean is reconstructed with a single set, like Proto-Japonic and Ainu, but unlike Tungusic, Mongolic and Turkic, which feature a voicing contrast. Korean also resembles Japonic and Ainu in having a single liquid consonant, while its continental neighbours tend to distinguish /l/ and /r/. Most modern varieties have a form of accent, marked by vowel length in central dialect

    Northeast Asia is home to several relatively shallow language families. There have been several attempts to link Korean with other language families, with the most-favoured being "Altaic" and Japonic. However, none of these attempts has succeeded in demonstrating a common descent for Koreanic and any other language family. Larger proposed groupings subsuming these hypotheses, such as Nostratic and Eurasiatic, have even less support.

    All modern varieties are descended from the language of Unified Silla. Evidence for the earlier linguistic history of the Korean peninsula is extremely sparse. Various proposals have been based on archaeological and ethnological theories and vague references in early Chinese histories. There is a tendency in Korea to assume that all languages formerly spoken on the peninsula were early forms of Korean, but the evidence indicates much greater linguistic variety in the past.

  6. History of Korean - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/History_of_the_Korean_language

    The language standard of this period is based on the dialect of Kaesong because Goryeo moved the capital city to the northern area of the Korean Peninsula.. The first foreign record of Korean is the Jilin leishi, written in 1103 by a Chinese Song dynasty writer, Sūn Mù 孫穆.

  7. Korean language and computers - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Korean_language_and_computers

    The writing system of Korean , Hangul , is an alphabet organized into blocks of syllables ; characters cannot just be written from left to right. Because of this, every possible syllable in Korean must either be rendered as syllable blocks by a font , or be encoded separately. Unicode uses the latter option. As an example, the syllable 하 (ha) consists of the characters ㅎ (h) and ㅏ (a ...

  8. Korean dialects - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Korean_dialects

    Zainichi Korean language (재일어; 재일조선어) is a language or a dialect spoken among Koreans in Japan, strongly influenced by Japanese. [ citation needed ] Korean language in China (중국조선어) As discussed above, Koreans in China use a dialect nearly identical to Hamgyŏng dialect in North Korea, but there are still some ...

  9. Hangul - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hangul

    Japan banned the Korean language from schools in 1938 as part of a policy of cultural assimilation, and all Korean-language publications were outlawed in 1941. Further reforms. The definitive modern Korean alphabet orthography was published in 1946, just after Korean independence from Japanese rule.

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