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  1. Rashid al-Din Hamadani. Rashīd al-Dīn Ṭabīb ( Persian: رشیدالدین طبیب ;‎ 1247–1318; also known as Rashīd al-Dīn Faḍlullāh Hamadānī, Persian: رشیدالدین فضل‌الله همدانی) was a statesman, historian and physician in Ilkhanate -ruled Iran. He was born in 1247 into a Persian Jewish family from ...

  2. Rashīd al-Dīn, (born 1247—died 1318), Persian statesman and historian who was the author of a universal history, Jāmiʿ al-tawārīkh (“Collector of Chronicles”). Rashīd al-Dīn belonged to a Jewish family of Hamadan, but he was converted to Islam and, as a physician, joined the court of the Mongol ruler of Persia, the Il-Khan Abagha (1265–82).

  3. Rashid al-Din Hamadani (1247-1318) was a Persian historian who wrote the " Compendium of Chronicles " at the request of Sultan Ghazan of the Ilkhanate. His work is considered to be the most important from the time. Biography

    • Biography
    • Jami Al-Tawarikh
    • Fahlavi Poems
    • Loss of Influence and Death
    • See Also

    Rashid al-Din Monafiq was born into a Jewish family at Hamadan now hamadan Province). His grandfather had been a courtier to the founder Ilkhanate ruler Hulagu Khan, and Rashid al-Din's father was an apothecary in the court. He converted to Islam around the age of thirty. Rashid was trained as a physician and started service under Hulagu's son Abaq...

    His encyclopedic history, the Jami al-Tawarikh ("Compendium of Chronicles") was commissioned by Mahmud Ghazan, and initially was a history of the Mongols and their dynasty, but gradually expanded to include the entire history since the time of Adam to Rashid al-Din's time. Rashid was assisted by Bolad, a Mongol nobleman who was the emissary of the ...

    There are some Fahlavi poems by him apparently in his native dialect: a hemistich called zabān-e fahlavī (1976, I, p. 290), a quatrain with the appellation bayt-efahlavī, and another hemistich titled zabān-e pahlavī(Fahlavi language).

    In 1312, his colleague, Sa'd al-Dawla, fell from power and was replaced by Ali Shah, who soon began intriguing to bring down Rashid al-Din. Then, in 1314, Mohammed Khodabanda died and power passed to his son, Abu Sa'id. Young and inexperienced, Abu Sa'id sided with 'Ali Shah. In 1318, Rashid al-Din was charged with having poisoned Oljeitu. During t...

    List of Muslim historians
    List of Iranian scientists and scholars
    Ghiyathu'd-Din ibn Rashid'ud-Din, his son
    • Biography
    • Jāmiʿ Al-Tawārīkh
    • Authorship of His Letters
    • Fahlavi Poems
    • Loss of Influence and Death
    • National and Political Thoughts
    • See Also
    • References
    • External Links

    Rashid al-Din was born into a Persian Jewish family in Hamadan, now in Hamadan Province. His grandfather had been a courtier to the founder Ilkhanate ruler Hulagu Khan, and Rashid al-Din’s father was an apothecaryat the court. He converted to Islam around the age of thirty. Rashid was trained as a physician and started service under Hulagu’s son, A...

    The Jāmiʿ al-Tawārīkh „Compendium of Chronicles“ was commissioned by Ghazan and initially was a history of the Mongols and their dynasty, but gradually expanded to include the entire history since the time of Adamto Rashid al-Din’s time. Rashid was assisted by Bolad, a Mongol nobleman who was the emissary of the Great Khan to the Ilkhanid court. Bo...

    Scholars are in dispute about whether Rashid al-Din’s Letters are a forgery or not. According to David Morgan in The Mongols Alexander Morton has shown them to be a forgery, probably from the Timurid period.One scholar who has attempted to defend the letters‘ authenticity is Abolala Soudovar.

    There are some fahlavīyāt by him apparently in his native dialect: a hemistich called zabān-e fahlavī (1976, I, p. 290), a quatrain with the appellation bayt-efahlavī, and another hemistich titled zabān-e pahlavī(„Fahlavi language“).

    In 1312, his colleague Sa’d al-Dawla fell from power and was replaced by ‚Ali Shah. Then, in 1314, Öljaitü died and power passed to his son, Abu Sa’id Bahadur Khan, who sided with ‚Ali Shah. In 1318, Rashid al-Din was charged with having poisoned Öljaitü and was executed on July 13, at the age of seventy.His Jewish ancestry was referenced numerous ...

    Rashid al-din was an Iranian patriot and also an admirer of the Iranian state traditions. The name of „Iran“ is mentioned in his Jami‘ al-tawarikh, and he showed dislike for Mongols (whom he refers to as Turks).

    Elliot, H. M. (Henry Miers), Sir; John Dowson. „10. Jámi’u-t Tawáríkh, of Rashid-al-Din“. The History of India, as Told by Its Own Historians. 3. London : Trübner & Co.

    Rashid al-din Hamadani’s Illustrated History of the Worldin digitised book form from the University of Edinburgh
  4. The Jāmiʿ al-Tawārīkh ("Compendium of Chronicles") was commissioned by Ghazan and initially was a history of the Mongols and their dynasty, but gradually expanded to include the entire history since the time of Adam to Rashid al-Din's time. Rashid was assisted by Bolad, a Mongol nobleman who was the emissary of the Great Khan to the ...

  5. Rashid-al-Din Hamadani Rashīd al-Dīn Ṭabīb ( Persian : رشیدالدین طبیب‎), also known as Rashīd al-Dīn Faḍlullāh Hamadānī (رشیدالدین فضل‌الله همدانی, 1247–1318), was a statesman, historian and physician in Ilkhanate -ruled Iran. [1]

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