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  1. Mar 7, 2019 · The problems of transcription and transnotation in ethnomusicology are especially important in Israel today because the concentration of so many different ethnic groups has led to increased research in their various folk musics.

  2. In the field of ethnomusicology, transcription has long been considered as an important skill which should lead the ethnomusicologist toward the analysis of folk music, non-Western art music and contemporary music in oral tradition. The objectives behind a musical analysis will determine the style of transcription to be applied.

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  4. everyone interested in the discipline of ethnomusicology regarding one of the most important tools of the trade, the transcription--as Seeger puts it, the "visual documentation of sound-recording" (see his "Report," p. 277, below)--and the interpretation of it. As Program Chairman for the 1963 meeting, I invited the four ethnomus-

  5. In the field of ethnomusicology, transcription has long been considered as an important skill which should lead the ethnomusicologist toward the analysis of folk music, non-Western art music and contemporary music in oral tradition. The objectives behind a musical analy­ sis will determine the style of transcription to be applied.

  6. www.britannica.com › science › ethnomusicologyethnomusicology | Britannica

    ethnomusicology, field of scholarship that encompasses the study of all world musics from various perspectives. It is defined either as the comparative study of musical systems and cultures or as the anthropological study of music. Although the field had antecedents in the 18th and early 19th centuries, it began to gather energy with the development of recording techniques in the late 19th ...

  7. field situation. It seems to me that any project in ethnomusicology can be conceived to fall into three major parts of which some may be stressed over others: 1) the actual gathering of materials in the field; 2) transcription and analysis; 3) the application of results obtained to relevant problems. I

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