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  1. Alhambra - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alhambra

    Alhambra derives from the Arabic الْحَمْرَاء al-Ḥamrāʼ (f.), meaning "the red one", the complete form of which was الْقَلْعَةُ ٱلْحَمْرَاءُ al-Qalʻat al-Ḥamrāʼ "the red fortress ". The "Al-" in "Alhambra" means "the" in Arabic, but this is ignored in general usage in both English and Spanish, where the ...

    • 1984 (8th session)
    • Alhambra, Generalife and Albayzín, Granada
  2. The Alhambra Decree (also known as the Edict of Expulsion; Spanish: Decreto de la Alhambra, Edicto de Granada) was an edict issued on 31 March 1492, by the joint Catholic Monarchs of Spain (Isabella I of Castile and Ferdinand II of Aragon) ordering the expulsion of practicing Jews from the Kingdoms of Castile and Aragon and its territories and possessions by 31 July of that year. The primary ...

  3. Jewish surname - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jewish_surname

    Part of the Alhambra Decree of 1492 contained a provision mandating fixed legal surnames for Sephardic Jews, but it wasn't until the 17th and 18th centuries that the rest of Europe followed suit, the Kingdom of Prussia began sequentially requiring Jews in its eastern provinces to adopt surnames in the 1790s, an edict affirmed by Napoleon ...

  4. Isaac Abarbanel - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Don_Isaac_Abravanel

    Alhambra Decree. The widely circulating Abarbanel's response to the Alhambra Decree is a literary invention in a fictional work The Alhambra Decree by David Raphael; it bears no relation to Abarbanel's actual thoughts and ideas. Legacy. The Synagogue Don Isaac Abravanel in Paris, France, was named in his memory. See also

  5. Alhambra Decree : definition of Alhambra Decree and synonyms ...

    dictionary.sensagent.com/Alhambra Decree/en-en

    The Alhambra Decree (also known as the Edict of Expulsion) was an edict issued on 31 March 1492 by the joint Catholic Monarchs of Spain (Isabella I of Castile and Ferdinand II of Aragon) ordering the expulsion of Jews from the Kingdoms of Castile and Aragon (not from the Kingdom of Navarre) and its territories and possessions by 31 July of that year.

  6. Alhambra Decree - Unionpedia, the concept map

    en.unionpedia.org/Alhambra_Decree

    The Alhambra Decree (also known as the Edict of Expulsion; Spanish: Decreto de la Alhambra, Edicto de Granada) was an edict issued on 31 March 1492, by the joint Catholic Monarchs of Spain (Isabella I of Castile and Ferdinand II of Aragon) ordering the expulsion of practicing Jews from the Kingdoms of Castile and Aragon and its territories and possessions by 31 July of that year. 85 relations.

  7. Publicising a historic event in Wikipedia | Bodleian Digital ...

    blogs.bodleian.ox.ac.uk/digital/2017/05/03/...

    May 03, 2017 · The fact must be stated in the “home” article, in this case Alhambra Decree. It can also go in the articles about the calendar date and the year. There are English Wikipedia articles about the year 1492 and about the date March 31. Unlike most Wikipedia articles, these are essentially lists of facts under different headings.

  8. Jews - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jewish

    Meanwhile Sephardic Jews experienced a golden age under Muslim rule, however following the Reconquista and subsequent Alhambra decree in 1492, most of the Spanish Jewish population immigrated to North Africa and the Ottoman Empire. However some Jews choose to remain and pretended to practice Catholicism.

  9. Reconquista - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Reconquista

    All remaining Jews were expelled from Spain as a consequence of the 1492 Alhambra Decree, and from Portugal in 1497. Former Jews were subject to the Spanish and Portuguese Inquisitions , established to enforce Christian faith and practice, which often resulted in secret investigations and public punishments of conversos in autos-da-fé ("acts ...

  10. Morisco - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Moriscos

    In 1517, the word morisco became a "category" added to the array of cultural and religious identities that existed at the time, used to identify Muslim converts to Christianity in Granada and Castille. The term was a pejorative adaptation of the adjective morisco ("Moorish"). It soon became the standard term to refer to all former Muslims in Spain.

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