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      • Augustus II (1670-1733), called Augustus the Strong, was elector of Saxony and king of Poland. Better known for his extravagance and promiscuity than for political shrewdness, he failed in his modest attempts to create a strong and independent Poland.
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  2. Augustus II the Strong (12 May 1670 – 1 February 1733), was Elector of Saxony from 1694 as well as King of Poland and Grand Duke of Lithuania from 1697 to 1706 and from 1709 until his death in 1733. He belonged to the Albertine branch of the House of Wettin.

  3. May 9, 2024 · Augustus II, king of Poland and elector of Saxony. Though he regained Poland’s former provinces of Podolia and Ukraine, his reign marked the beginning of Poland’s decline as a European power. His hopes of establishing a strong Polish monarchy came to naught and his death triggered the War of the Polish Succession.

    • The Editors of Encyclopaedia Britannica
  4. 1. He Wasnt Supposed To Have Power. Augustus II was born in May 1670 to gold and glory. As the son of the current Elector of Saxony, little Augustus wanted for almost nothing as a child. But there was one thing missing. Augustus was merely the second son of the family, and thus had no hopes of inheriting the Electorate when he grew up.

  5. Augustus's forces in Poland suffered serious defeats, and he was deposed by the Swedes in January 1704 when a rump Polish parliament elected Charles's client as king. Augustus's Saxon troops continued to fight, suffering a terrible defeat at Fraustadt in February 1706. Swedish troops occupied Saxony for a year.

  6. Jun 27, 2018 · Augustus II (1670-1733), called Augustus the Strong, was elector of Saxony and king of Poland. Better known for his extravagance and promiscuity than for political shrewdness, he failed in his modest attempts to create a strong and independent Poland.

  7. The Union of Lublin of 1569 constituted the Polish–Lithuanian Commonwealth, a more closely merged continuation of the already existing personal union of the Crown of Poland and the Grand Duchy of Lithuania.

  8. Augustus II. A personal union with Saxony, where Augustus II was a strong ruler, seemed at first to offer some advantages to Poland. A king with a power base of his own might reform the Commonwealth, which was still a huge state and potentially a great power. But such hopes proved vain.

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