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  1. Genetically modified potato - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Genetically_modified_potato

    A modified Désirée potato was developed in the 1990s by biochemist John Gatehouse at Cambridge Agricultural Genetics (later renamed Axis Genetics) and had gone through two years of field trials at Rothamsted Experimental Station.

  2. Are GMO Potatoes Safe? A Biogenineer Reveals The Truth

    foodrevolution.org/blog/gmo-potatoes-hidden-dangers

    Oct 17, 2018 · Given the nature of the potato industry, the most common potato varieties, such as Russet Burbank and Ranger Russet, will soon be contaminated with GMO stock. Other GMO Foods Have Hidden Concerns, Too. My book describes the many hidden issues of GMO potatoes, but GMO potatoes are not the exception. They are the rule.

  3. Genetically modified potatoes are studied, criticized in ...

    www.washingtonpost.com/local/genetically...

    Ewen Mullins is the face of modern Ireland: Young, cosmopolitan, highly educated, he is a plant scientist whose work on a genetically modified potato inherently looks to the future.

  4. People also ask

    Why are potatoes GMO?

    Are GMO potatoes genetically modified?

    Who invented the Simplot potato?

    Are white potatoes GMO?

  5. GMO scientist admits to worrying about ... - Food Evolution News

    foodevolution.news/2019-03-07-scientist-worrying...

    After spending twenty-six years in the agriculture industry as a genetic engineer, Rommens has developed over 150,000 varieties of GM potatoes. Through the years of experimentation, Rommens admits he never once left the laboratory to observe how the GM potatoes performed in a real agricultural environment.

  6. The GMO Potato: What Consumers Need to Know | Living Non-GMO ...

    livingnongmo.org/2018/10/31/the-gmo-potato-what...

    You may have heard of Dr. Caius Rommens, the scientist who developed the Simplot potatoes.

  7. GMO Potatoes - Everything You Need To Know | GMO Answers

    gmoanswers.com/everything-potato-lover-needs...

    By Nat Graham. Nat Graham is a sixth year doctoral candidate in the Division of Biological Sciences at the University of Missouri Columbia. His research focuses on improving genetic transformation in maize. He is also the founder of a local program called “Science on Tap”, designed to give graduate students the opportunity to present their research to the community. This post was ...

  8. Genetically Modified Foods: Toxins and Reproductive Failures ...

    www.responsibletechnology.org/genetically...

    Jul 06, 2007 · Rhetoric from Washington since the early 1990s proclaims that genetically modified (GM) foods are no different from their natural counterparts that have existed for centuries. But this is a political, not a scientific assertion. Numerous scientists at the FDA consistently described these newly introduced gene-spliced foods as cause for concern. In addition to their potential to produce hard-to ...

  9. GMO Potatoes; Good or Bad? | The Hacker's Hangout

    potatohack.com/2017/03/15/gmo-potatoes-good-or-bad

    This GMO potato, called Amflora, was approved in the EU in 2010, but withdrawn in 2012 due to lack of acceptance by EU farmers. Other than that, experiments in GMO potatoes are pretty rare to find. How to Avoid. If you are dead-set against eating any GMO products, your best bet is to eat only food you’ve grown yourself, or has a certified ...

  10. Altered Food, GMOs, Genetically Modified Food - National ...

    www.nationalgeographic.com/.../food-how-altered

    Lately scientists have been experimenting with potatoes, modifying them with genes of bees and moths to protect the crops from potato blight fungus, and grapevines with silkworm genes to make the ...

  11. What Varieties of Potatoes Are GMO? | Livestrong.com

    www.livestrong.com/article/218439-what-varieties...

    Genetically modified potatoes are on the way to market as of 2015. The U.S. government has deemed GM foods safe, but not all scientists agree. There is no legislation requiring the labeling of GMO foods, and critics worry about potential contamination of the conventional food supply and the safety of increased herbicide use.