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  1. Food Scientists: New GMO Potatoes ‘Extremely Worrisome’

    www.infowars.com/food-scientists-new-gmo...

    Nov 11, 2014 · Studies suggest that most would not (though you won’t even be told thanks to the lack of GMO labeling), and now major food scientists are speaking out over the reality that the Franken potato may come with ‘worrisome’ and unknown consequences.

  2. Genetically Modified Potatoes: Scientists Unleash New Monster ...

    www.naturalnews.com/030411_GM_potatoes_food...

    Nov 16, 2010 · A new genetically modified creation has emerged, and may soon end up on your dinner table. Researchers in India have developed a genetically modified potato, loaded with genetically altered amino acids. It seems as if scientists are attempting to recreate nature entirely.

  3. Genetically modified potato - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Genetically_modified_potato

    Innate. The genetically modified Innate potato was approved by the USDA in 2014 and the FDA in 2015. The cultivar was developed by J. R. Simplot Company. It is designed to resist blackspot bruising, browning and to contain less of the amino acid asparagine that turns into acrylamide during the frying of potatoes.

  4. What is some information about genetically modified food ...

    www.answers.com/Q/What_is_some_information_about...

    Some information about GMO foods: According to the industriy and many governments and scientists, GMOs have been extensively studied. They cite almost 2,000 scientific studies as evidence that ...

  5. GMO Potatoes; Good or Bad? | The Hacker's Hangout

    potatohack.com/2017/03/15/gmo-potatoes-good-or-bad

    GMO Techniques for Potatoes. In 2014, potato producer JR Simplot introduced a line of bruise-proof potatoes called Innate . These potatoes promised “less waste, more potato,” and were targeted towards the fast-food industry where potato waste costs lots of money. Innate® potatoes are less prone to bruising and black spots,...

  6. The History and Future of GM Potatoes | PotatoPro

    www.potatopro.com/news/2010/history-and-future...

    In North America, currently no genetically modified potatoes are commercially grown. But the GM potato has already a colorful history in the US and Canada: Between 1996 and 2001 Monsanto introduced a range of GM potatoes with resistances against Colorado beetle and PVY virus (Newleaf/Naturemark).

  7. USDA Approves 2 New Varieties of GMO Potatoes - EcoWatch

    www.ecowatch.com/gmo-potatoes-2075786727.html

    Same goes for canola. More than half of sugar beets are also grown from GMO seeds. The same cannot be said for potatoes. Indeed, field tests of an early GMO potato variety sparked one of the first protests against the technology back in the late 1980s and the industry remained largely GMO-free.

  8. Peru Bans Monsanto and GMOs | Food Renegade

    www.foodrenegade.com/peru-bans-monsanto-gmos

    Dec 03, 2012 · Peru’s ban on GMO foods prohibits the import, production and use of genetically modified foods. The law is aimed at safeguarding the country’s agricultural diversity and preventing cross-pollination with non-GMO crops. It will also help protect Peruvian exports of organic products. The victory is a long time coming.

  9. The Health Risks of GMOs Have Been Systematically Misrepresented

    www.independentsciencenews.org/health/the-uks...

    Aug 14, 2017 · Further, scientists know of only two bacterial species that can insert their genes into the DNA of plants, and those genes are hardly ever incorporated into an entire genome (10). There are only three plant species in which such integrations have been observed, and just one is a food crop (sweet potato).

  10. What Varieties of Potatoes Are GMO? | Livestrong.com

    www.livestrong.com/article/218439-what-varieties...

    Genetically modified potatoes are on the way to market as of 2015. The U.S. government has deemed GM foods safe, but not all scientists agree. There is no legislation requiring the labeling of GMO foods, and critics worry about potential contamination of the conventional food supply and the safety of increased herbicide use.