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  1. History of agriculture - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/History_of_agriculture

    3 days ago · The increased supply of food reduced disease, increased births and reduced mortality, causing a population boom throughout the British Empire, the US and Europe. The introduction of the potato also brought about the first intensive use of fertilizer, in the form of guano imported to Europe from Peru, and the first artificial pesticide, in the ...

  2. Cabbage - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cabbage

    Sep 11, 2020 · Cabbage seedlings have a thin taproot and cordate (heart-shaped) cotyledons.The first leaves produced are ovate (egg-shaped) with a lobed petiole.Plants are 40–60 cm (16–24 in) tall in their first year at the mature vegetative stage, and 1.5–2.0 m (4 ft 11 in–6 ft 7 in) tall when flowering in the second year.

  3. Free Daily Crossword Puzzles | Dictionary.com

    www.dictionary.com/e/crosswor

    3 days ago · Online Crossword Puzzles. Play the daily crossword puzzle from Dictionary.com and grow your vocabulary and improve your language skills. Learn new words and practice problem solving skills when you play the daily crossword puzzle. Use the crossword solver from Dictionary.com to help fill in all the clues.

  4. List of criminal enterprises, gangs, and syndicates - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_criminal...

    5 days ago · This is a listing of enterprises, gangs, mafias, and syndicates that are involved in organized crime. Tongs and outlaw motorcycle gangs, as well as terrorist, militant, and paramilitary groups, are mentioned if they are involved in criminal activity for funding.

  5. Salmon - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Salmon

    5 days ago · Salmon / ˈ s æ m ə n / is the common name for several species of ray-finned fish in the family Salmonidae.Other fish in the same family include trout, char, grayling and whitefish.

  6. Gluten - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gluten

    5 days ago · However, a 2020 study by the Leibniz-Institute for Food Systems Biology casts doubt on the idea that modern wheat has higher gluten levels. From a seed bank, they grew and analyzed 60 wheat cultivars from between 1891 and 2010 and found no changes in albumin/globulin and gluten contents over time.

  7. 5 days ago · The Bozeman Daily Chronicle is the newspaper of record for Bozeman and southwest Montana -- Empowering the Community.

  8. Strangest Unsolved Mysteries of All Time | Reader's Digest

    www.rd.com/list/strangest-unsolved-mysteries

    4 days ago · The only clue was the word “Croatoan,” the name of a native tribe allied with the English, which was carved into a post. White took this to mean that the colonists had moved to Croatoan Island ...

    • Origins
    • Appearance
    • Characteristics
    • Usage
    • Preparation
    • Chemistry
    • Composition
    • Research
    • Prevention
    • Variations

    Cultivated by the Aztecs 8,000 years ago and still a native crop in Peru, the ancient history of amaranth can be traced to Mexico and the Yucatan Peninsula. Today, it's grown in Africa, India, China, Russia, throughout South America, and emerging once again in North America.

    Somewhat of an unknown quantity to many, amaranth is tall - often six feet with broad green leaves, bright red or gold flowers, and around 60 different species. The flowers are made up of miniscule, grain-like buds, one reason why this plant often falls into the \\"grain\\" category. But amaranth isn't technically a grain like oats, wheat, or rice. It's sometimes referred to as a \\"pseudo-cereal\\" because its nutritional profile is very similar.

    One of the most important aspects of this tiny grain is that it's gluten-free. When ground, the flour is generally a pale ivory shade, although the red \\"buds\\" can be ground as well for a red-tinged and very healthful grain.

    Being extremely dense, amaranth is too heavy to be used by itself. It's best used with other grains for a lighter texture, and with a proven combination of ingredients like guar gum to impersonate gluten. Amaranth can be used as an exceptional thickener for sauces, soups, stews, and even jellies. Eaten as a snack, amaranth can have a light, nutty, or peppery-crunchy texture and flavor. Best of all, amaranth is even more nutritious than its true-grain counterparts.

    Cooking amaranth is comparable to cooking pasta or rice: boil plenty of water (six cups of water per one cup of amaranth), measure the grain into it, cook and stir for 15 to 20 minutes, drain, rinse, and eat. Note: It's important that the amaranth is placed in a fine mesh sieve. The grain is so tiny that it will slip through a traditional strainer. If one is not available, place the cooked amaranth on a large baking sheet, and spread it in a thin layer so it will cool without clumping together.

    Amaranth is a great source of lysine, an important amino acid with protein content comparable to that of milk, more easily digested; neither can be said of other grains. To support this positive aspect of amaranth, it also contains primary proteins called albumin and globulins, which, in comparison with the prolamins in wheat, are more soluble and digestible.

    One cup of raw amaranth contains 15 milligrams of iron, while white rice contains only 1.5 milligrams. One cup of raw amaranth also contains 18 milligrams of fiber; in comparison, white rice contains 2.4 grams. At 105% of the daily value per serving, the manganese in amaranth is off the charts, yet it contains fewer carbohydrates. Amaranth contains more than three times the amount of calcium and it's also high in magnesium, phosphorus, and potassium. Amaranth contains 6 to 10% oil, predominantly unsaturated, or around 77% unsaturated fatty acids, including linoleic acid, required for optimum nutrition. Not least in this list, amaranth is the only grain with documented vitamin C content.

    Researchers suggested further investigation on the function of health-beneficial peptides in amaranth, particularly lunasin, which was previously identified in soybeans and thought to have cancer-preventing benefits, as well as lowering incidences of chronic diseases, such as inflammation, diabetes, heart disease, and stroke.1 Researchers suggested further investigation on the function of health-beneficial peptides in amaranth, particularly lunasin, which was previously identified in soybeans and thought to have cancer-preventing benefits, as well as lowering incidences of chronic diseases, such as inflammation, diabetes, heart disease, and stroke.1

    As cardiovascular disease (CVD) is linked to high blood cholesterol (hyperlipidemia), hypertension, obesity, and diabetes, scientists reported that reducing saturated fat while increasing unsaturated fatty acids can prevent CVD. Amaranth was studied in relation to these findings and found it to be potentially beneficial for CVD patients. As cardiovascular disease (CVD) is linked to high blood cholesterol (hyperlipidemia), hypertension, obesity, and diabetes, scientists reported that reducing saturated fat while increasing unsaturated fatty acids can prevent CVD. Amaranth was studied in relation to these findings and found it to be potentially beneficial for CVD patients.

    In Mexico, a bon-bon of sorts is made from popped amaranth mixed with sugar or honey, and called \\"dulce de alegria\\" or sweet delight.\\" They're formed into little skull-like confections and distributed during the Mexican \\"Día de Muertos\\" or \\"Day of the Dead\\" celebration.

  9. Home | 22 Words

    twentytwowords.com

    4 days ago · 22 Words collects a blend of everything from the serious and creative to the silly and absurd. As your source for the crazy, curious, and comical side of the web, 22 Words can be counted on to share funny and fascinating viral content as well as more obscure (but equally interesting) pictures, videos, and more.