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  1. What Varieties of Potatoes Are GMO? | Livestrong.com

    www.livestrong.com/article/218439-what-varieties...

    Genetically modified potatoes are on the way to market as of 2015. The U.S. government has deemed GM foods safe, but not all scientists agree. There is no legislation requiring the labeling of GMO foods, and critics worry about potential contamination of the conventional food supply and the safety of increased herbicide use.

  2. GMO potatoes: The risks to health - gmwatch.org

    gmwatch.org/en/news/latest-news/18506-gmo...

    In an interview with GMWatch, Dr Rommens discussed the risks to health posed by the GMO potatoes he created. GMW: In your article for Independent Science News, you mention that "The GMO potatoes are likely to accumulate at least two toxins that are absent in normal potatoes”. Can you tell us which toxins these are and what health problems ...

  3. Food Scientists: New GMO Potatoes ‘Extremely Worrisome’

    www.infowars.com/food-scientists-new-gmo...

    Would you eat the newly approved genetically modified potato now set for commercial planting in the US? Studies suggest that most would not (though you won’t even be told thanks to the lack of GMO labeling), and now major food scientists are speaking out over the reality that the Franken potato may come with ‘worrisome’ and unknown consequences.

  4. USDA Approves 2 New Varieties of GMO Potatoes - EcoWatch

    www.ecowatch.com/gmo-potatoes-2075786727.html

    Indeed, field tests of an early GMO potato variety sparked one of the first protests against the technology back in the late 1980s and the industry remained largely GMO-free. It was just last year that the potato industry began planting a GMO variety on a commercial scale, a cultivar also developed by Simplot and named White Russet.

  5. GMO Potatoes; Good or Bad? | The Hacker's Hangout

    potatohack.com/2017/03/15/gmo-potatoes-good-or-bad

    One of the very first Bt GMO crops to be developed was NewLeaf Potatoes by Monsanto in 1995, however, demand for this variety was so low that they discontinued the line in 2001. Another GMO attempt was made to produce potatoes high in amylopectin starch for the production of waxy potato starch . This GMO potato,...

  6. Scientist mom evaluates Simplot’s GMO Innate potato | Genetic ...

    geneticliteracyproject.org/2015/05/27/scientist...

    The Innate Potato is a GMO that was recently approved for cultivation in the US. It is made by Simplot (or J.R Simplot Company). According to their website , they are a “food and agribusiness ...

  7. Peru Bans Monsanto and GMOs | Food Renegade

    www.foodrenegade.com/peru-bans-monsanto-gmos

    Thanks to the indomitable spirit of that people, a ten-year ban on GMOs takes effect this week in Peru! It not only bans GMO crops like Monsanto’s BT-Corn, but also expands on a prior law that required all foods on supermarket shelves that contain GMOs to be labeled.

  8. Genetically modified potatoes are studied, criticized in ...

    www.washingtonpost.com/local/genetically...

    Ewen Mullins is the face of modern Ireland: Young, cosmopolitan, highly educated, he is a plant scientist whose work on a genetically modified potato inherently looks to the future.

  9. Genetically modified potato - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Genetically_modified_potato

    Innate. The genetically modified Innate potato was approved by the USDA in 2014 and the FDA in 2015. The cultivar was developed by J. R. Simplot Company. It is designed to resist blackspot bruising, browning and to contain less of the amino acid asparagine that turns into acrylamide during the frying of potatoes.

  10. List of Vegetables That Are Genetically Modified | Healthy ...

    healthyeating.sfgate.com/list-vegetables...

    Genetically modified vegetables have been engineered to possess qualities that are not naturally present in the food. Scientists are able to take the genes from one plant or animal and insert them into the DNA of another, making the modified organism grow faster and larger, or to be more resistant to disease.