Yahoo Web Search

  1. The History and Future of GM Potatoes | PotatoPro

    www.potatopro.com/news/2010/history-and-future...

    The History and Future of GM Potatoes March 10, 2010 Update August 2013: To the best of our knowledge there are still no GMO potatoes marketed for human consumption anywhere in the world, although we expect that to change within the next few years.

  2. Scientist mom evaluates Simplot’s GMO Innate potato | Genetic ...

    geneticliteracyproject.org/2015/05/27/scientist...

    The Innate Potato is a GMO that was recently approved for cultivation in the US. It is made by Simplot (or J.R Simplot Company). According to their website , they are a “food and agribusiness ...

  3. Scientist that discovered GMO health hazards immediately ...

    www.naturalnews.com/037665_GMO_scientists_organ...

    Scientist that discovered GMO health hazards immediately fired, team dismantled. Arpad Pusztai, who is considered to be one of the world's most respected and well-learned biochemists, had for three years led a team of researchers from Scotland's prestigious Rowett Research Institute (RRI) in studying the health effects of a novel GM potato...

  4. GMO Potatoes; Good or Bad? | The Hacker's Hangout

    potatohack.com/2017/03/15/gmo-potatoes-good-or-bad

    GMO Techniques for Potatoes. In 2014, potato producer JR Simplot introduced a line of bruise-proof potatoes called Innate . These potatoes promised “less waste, more potato,” and were targeted towards the fast-food industry where potato waste costs lots of money. Innate® potatoes are less prone to bruising and black spots,...

  5. USDA Approves 2 New Varieties of GMO Potatoes - EcoWatch

    www.ecowatch.com/gmo-potatoes-2075786727.html

    Indeed, field tests of an early GMO potato variety sparked one of the first protests against the technology back in the late 1980s and the industry remained largely GMO-free. It was just last year that the potato industry began planting a GMO variety on a commercial scale, a cultivar also developed by Simplot and named White Russet.

  6. USDA approves genetically engineered potatoes despite GMO ...

    www.naturalnews.com/055917_GMO_potatoes_consumer...

    The study, led by Gilles-Eric Seralini of the University of Caen, was the first ever study to examine the long-term (lifetime) effects of eating GMOs. He was later forced to retract it because of major pressure by Big Food, agribusiness giant Monsanto and colluding governments.

  7. Genetically modified potato - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Genetically_engineered_potato

    Amflora' (also known as EH92-527-1) was a cultivar developed by BASF Plant Science for production of pure amylopectin starch for processing into waxy potato starch. It was approved for industrial applications in the European Union market on 2 March 2010 by the European Commission , [12] but was withdrawn from the EU market in January 2012 due to a lack of acceptance from farmers and consumers.

  8. The Natural GMO: Bacteria Genetically Modified Sweet Potatoes ...

    www.medicaldaily.com/natural-gmo-bacteria...

    The Natural GMO: Bacteria Genetically Modified Sweet Potatoes 8,000 Years Ago. The scientists discovered that bacteria likely served as genetic engineers themselves, up to 8,000 years ago, when they inserted themselves into the sweet potato’s ancestor. In short, bacteria were making GMOs way before we figured out how to use bacteria to make GMOs.

  9. Genetically modified food - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Genetically_modified_food

    Genetically modified microbial enzymes were the first application of genetically modified organisms in food production and were approved in 1988 by the US Food and Drug Administration. In the early 1990s, recombinant chymosin was approved for use in several countries.

  10. Genetically modified potatoes are studied, criticized in ...

    www.washingtonpost.com/local/genetically...

    (Adrian Higgins/The Washington Post) Ewen Mullins is the face of modern Ireland: Young, cosmopolitan, highly educated, he is a plant scientist whose work on a genetically modified potato inherently looks to the future. But Mullins also must think back to one of Ireland’s darkest chapters, the Great Famine of the 1840s. “It’s always there,” he said.