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  1. Genetically modified potatoes 'resist late blight' - BBC News

    www.bbc.com/news/science-environment-26189722

    British scientists have developed genetically modified potatoes that are resistant to the vegetable's biggest threat - blight. A three-year trial has shown that these potatoes can thrive despite...

  2. Genetically modified potato - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Genetically_modified_potato

    In 2014, a team of British scientists published a paper about three-year field trial showing that another genetically modified version of the Désirée cultivar can resist infection after exposure to late blight, one of the most serious diseases of potatoes. They developed this potato for blight resistance by inserting a gene (Rpi-vnt1.1), into ...

  3. The True Story of Golden Rice, the Genetically Modified ...

    foreignpolicy.com/2019/10/17/golden-rice...

    Oct 17, 2019 · On Feb. 9, 2001, Greenpeace, which had a long record of opposition to all GMO foods and crops, issued a statement that an adult would have to eat 9 kilograms (about 20 pounds) of cooked Golden ...

    • Ed Regis
  4. People also ask

    Why are potatoes GMO?

    Are GMO potatoes genetically modified?

    Who invented the Simplot potato?

    Why are potatoes being genetically modified?

  5. GMO scientist admits to worrying about the negative side ...

    foodevolution.news/2019-03-07-scientist-worrying...

    Mar 07, 2019 · After spending twenty-six years in the agriculture industry as a genetic engineer, Rommens has developed over 150,000 varieties of GM potatoes. Through the years of experimentation, Rommens admits he never once left the laboratory to observe how the GM potatoes performed in a real agricultural environment.

  6. The GMO Potato: What Consumers Need to Know | Living Non-GMO ...

    livingnongmo.org/2018/10/31/the-gmo-potato-what...

    Oct 31, 2018 · The Non-GMO Project’s full-time research team has kept a watchful eye on these potatoes since their debut and continues to monitor their presence in the North American food supply. To understand RNA interference, it is important to know that messenger RNA (mRNA) carries genetic instructions from the cell nucleus out to other parts of a cell.

  7. GMO potatoes: The risks to health

    gmwatch.org/en/news/latest-news/18506-gmo...

    Oct 11, 2018 · Dr Caius Rommens developed GMO potatoes, but subsequently renounced his work. He explains why we should be wary of the products he created. Dr Caius Rommens developed GMO potatoes for the Idaho-based agbiotech company Simplot. The chief genetic modification he introduced was to silence the potatoes' melanin (PPO) gene.

  8. Feeding the World One Genetically Modified Tomato at a Time ...

    sitn.hms.harvard.edu/flash/2015/feeding-the-world
    • An Unsustainable Trend
    • Ming 2.0
    • Trial by Fire

    If you’ve recently been feeling more claustrophobic than usual, you might want to blame your growing cohort of fellow humans. The world population has doubled over the past 50 years and continues to grow by roughly 100 million people each year (Figure 1). Even though the growth rate appears to be slowing, the population will likely continue to grow throughout the 21st century and could reach 11 billion by 2100 . This dramatic boom has evoked fears that our rapidly-growing population will surpass Earth’s inherent “carrying capacity” for humankind, echoing Thomas Malthus’ warnings from the late 18thcentury. Thankfully, with regard to physical living space, these fears appear to be overblown; to reiterate a popular factoid, every human on the planet could live in a Texas-sized area that has the same population density as New York City . Figure 1: 2015 UN Population Projections for the 21st CenturyThe chart above illustrates previous world population trends and future probabilistic proj...

    Modifying the genomes — the biological instruction manuals that dictate how organisms are assembled and maintained — of staple crops like rice, corn, and soybeans could relieve many of the pressures on the worldwide food supply. Recent advances in genome editing technology have allowed scientists to precisely add, delete, and rearrange pieces of genetic code to imbue crops with desirable characteristics (see this article). While it may sound like science fiction, large chemical companies like DuPont and Monsanto have been using this technology for over two decades on a wide variety of plants, many of which may alleviate world hunger. In 1994, Calgene introduced the first GM crop to be sold in the United States, the Flavr Savr tomato, which ripened slowly and had an extended shelf-life . Flavr Savr tomatoes eventually disappeared from grocery stores because high production costs prevented them from becoming profitable, but lengthening the amount of time that produce stays fresh may b...

    Another strategy that genetic engineers are currently pursuing is the development of drought-resistant crops. As the climate steadily warms, droughts are projected to occur more frequently and to last longer, threatening harvests worldwide. In fact, the drought that’s been wringing California dry for almost four years is the worst that the Golden State has seen in over a century . Additionally, a drought-mediated contraction in the food supply would likely result in higher prices and, thus, further lower the amount of food that’s accessible to the world’s poor. Farmers could hedge against these potential losses by planting GM crops that can flourish in both wet and arid conditions. African farmers, in particular, may be able to use these crops to exploit previously untapped agricultural opportunities. By doing so, these crops could also increase the food supply in one of the world’s most malnourished areas. Unfortunately, current GM drought-resistant crops typically fare no better i...

  9. Altered Food, GMOs, Genetically Modified Food - National ...

    www.nationalgeographic.com/.../food-how-altered

    Lately scientists have been experimenting with potatoes, modifying them with genes of bees and moths to protect the crops from potato blight fungus, and grapevines with silkworm genes to make the ...

  10. Are GMO Potatoes Safe? A Biogenineer Reveals The Truth

    foodrevolution.org/blog/gmo-potatoes-hidden-dangers

    Oct 17, 2018 · The GMO potatoes are likely to accumulate at least two toxins that are absent in normal potatoes, and newer versions (Innate 2.0) additionally lost their sensory qualities when fried. Furthermore, the GMO potatoes contain at least as many bruises as normal potatoes, but these undesirable bruises are now concealed .

  11. | GMO Potatoes; Good or Bad?The Hacker's Hangout

    potatohack.com/2017/03/15/gmo-potatoes-good-or-bad

    May 03, 2017 · This GMO potato, called Amflora, was approved in the EU in 2010, but withdrawn in 2012 due to lack of acceptance by EU farmers. Other than that, experiments in GMO potatoes are pretty rare to find. How to Avoid. If you are dead-set against eating any GMO products, your best bet is to eat only food you’ve grown yourself, or has a certified ...