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  1. Genetically Modified Foods: Toxins and Reproductive Failures ...

    www.responsibletechnology.org/genetically...

    Jul 06, 2007 · Rhetoric from Washington since the early 1990s proclaims that genetically modified (GM) foods are no different from their natural counterparts that have existed for centuries. But this is a political, not a scientific assertion. Numerous scientists at the FDA consistently described these newly introduced gene-spliced foods as cause for concern. In addition to their potential to produce hard-to ...

  2. Genetically modified potatoes are studied, criticized in ...

    www.washingtonpost.com/local/genetically...

    Ewen Mullins is the face of modern Ireland: Young, cosmopolitan, highly educated, he is a plant scientist whose work on a genetically modified potato inherently looks to the future.

  3. Potato - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Potato_(food)

    Potato Potato cultivars appear in a variety of colors, shapes, and sizes. Scientific classification Kingdom: Plantae Clade: Tracheophytes Clade: Angiosperms Clade: Eudicots Clade: Asterids Order: Solanales Family: Solanaceae Genus: Solanum Species: S. tuberosum Binomial name Solanum tuberosum L. Synonyms List Solanum andigenum Juz. & Bukasov Solanum apurimacense Vargas Solanum aquinas Bukasov ...

  4. Foods That Are GMO - Organic Lifestyle Magazine

    www.organiclifestylemagazine.com/foods-that-are-gmo

    May 31, 2013 · That may soon change. BASF requested cultivation and marketing approval in 2011 for its Fortuna potato, genetically modified to be resistant to late blight. Many consumers concerned about GMO foods believe that conventional potatoes will not sprout because they are genetically modified. But this is not the case.

  5. Genetically modified plants and human health - Suzie Key ...

    journals.sagepub.com/doi/full/10.1258/jrsm.2008...

    Jun 01, 2008 · In a four-year programme, researchers studied the effect of management practices associated with ‘genetically modified herbicide tolerance’ on farm wildlife, compared with conventional weed control. 69 The study reported that for three of the four crops tested, the wildlife was reduced in the GM fields compared to non-GM, but in the final ...

  6. (PDF) A Review on Impacts of Genetically Modified Food on ...

    www.researchgate.net/publication/215650437_A...

    Feb 20, 2013 · Genetically modified food is a term referring to genetically modified plants or/and the food contains components of genetically modified plants, as well as products of genetically modified ...

  7. Independent GMO research is trashed: scientists hounded ...

    ahrp.org/how-independent-scientific-gmo-research...

    Mar 01, 2017 · Despite these concerted efforts by shadowy forces in the GMO industry and the UK and US governments who sought to prevent its publication, the study subsequently passed rigorous peer-review by a far larger than usual panel of scientists, and was published in the leading scientific journal, The Lancet (1999) Dr. Stanley Ewen, co-author of the study, stated that after publication, his career ...

  8. Say No To GMOs! - December 2010b

    www.saynotogmos.org/ud2010/udec10b.php

    Not only were the scientists at the FDA aware that GMOs were different, they had warned repeatedly that they might create allergies, toxins, new diseases and nutritional problems. But they were ignored, and their warnings were even denied, and the policy went forth allowing the deployment GMOs into the food supply with virtually no safety studies.

  9. Center for Food Safety | Issues | | GE Foods

    www.centerforfoodsafety.org/issues/311/ge-foods/...

    The well-respected British medical journal, The Lancet, published an important study conducted by Drs. Arpad Pusztai and Stanley W.B. Ewen under a grant from the Scottish government. The study examined the effect on rats of the consumption of potatoes genetically engineered to contain the biopesticide Bacillus Thuringiensis (B.t ...

  10. GMOs: Research Says They'll Help End Starvation, but ...

    alumni.berkeley.edu/california-magazine/just-in/...

    Most are used to feed livestock or as ingredients in processed foods. (Genetically modified cotton is used to make clothing.) Also approved are limited varieties of produce, including papaya, squash, plums, cantaloupe, radicchio, tomatoes, potatoes and sweet corn. As of yet, these GM fruits and vegetables are not commonly found in supermarkets.