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  1. USDA Approves 2 New Varieties of GMO Potatoes - EcoWatch

    www.ecowatch.com/gmo-potatoes-2075786727.html

    The Times takes to task two of the biotech industry's dominant claims about the need for GMO crops: First, that genetic modification is essential if we're going to grow enough food to feed the planet's burgeoning population, and second, that by engineering crops to resist common pests while withstanding application of herbicides, those crops would in turn require fewer dangerous chemical inputs.

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  3. What Varieties of Potatoes Are GMO? | Livestrong.com

    www.livestrong.com/article/218439-what-varieties...

    Genetically modified potatoes are on the way to market as of 2015. The U.S. government has deemed GM foods safe, but not all scientists agree. There is no legislation requiring the labeling of GMO foods, and critics worry about potential contamination of the conventional food supply and the safety of increased herbicide use.

  4. Genetically modified potatoes are studied, criticized in ...

    www.washingtonpost.com/local/genetically...

    Genetically modified potatoes are studied, criticized in Ireland ... Rwanda and parts of India and Uganda rely heavily on the potato as a staple, he said, and the disease is halving yields because ...

  5. The History and Future of GM Potatoes | PotatoPro

    www.potatopro.com/.../history-and-future-gm-potatoes

    Amflora is the first GM crop approved by the EC in 12 years and as such it is a major milestone on a continent that has always strongly opposed GM crops.. The fact that Europe's newly approved GM crop is a potato for industrial starch production rather than food may make this reversal easier to digest: for now, the end product is more likely to be found in your glossy printing paper than on ...

  6. U.S. approves 3 types of genetically engineered potatoes ...

    www.denverpost.com/2017/02/28/us-genetically...

    Three types of potatoes genetically engineered to resist the pathogen that caused the Irish potato famine are safe for the environment and safe to eat, federal officials announced.

  7. India nears approval of first GM food crop | Science | AAAS

    www.sciencemag.org/news/2017/05/india-nears...

    May 15, 2017 · India nears approval of first GM food crop. By Pallava Bagla May. 15, 2017 , 11:15 AM. Amidst acrimonious debate over the safety of genetically modified (GM) food crops, India’s top ...

  8. GMO Potatoes; Good or Bad? | The Hacker's Hangout

    potatohack.com/2017/03/15/gmo-potatoes-good-or-bad

    Other than these three potatoes (Innate Gen 1, Ranger Russet, and Atlantic), there does not appear to be any more GMO potatoes headed to a grocery store or fast-food joint near you. Any others? One of the very first Bt GMO crops to be developed was NewLeaf Potatoes by Monsanto in 1995, however, demand for this variety was so low that they ...

  9. Genetically modified potato - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Genetically_engineered_potato

    A genetically modified potato is a potato that has had its genes modified, using genetic engineering.Goals of modification include introducing pest resistance, tweaking the amounts of certain chemicals produced by the plant, and to prevent browning or bruising of the tubers.

  10. History of the potato - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/History_of_the_potato

    Sailors returning from the Andes to Spain with silver presumably brought maize and potatoes for their own food on the trip. Historians speculate that leftover tubers (and maize) were carried ashore and planted: "We think that the potato arrived some years before the end of the 16th century, by two different ports of entry: the first, logically, in Spain around 1570, and the second via the ...

  11. Genetically modified crops in India

    deskuenvis.nic.in/pdf/gm.pdf

    Scientists have created a frost­resistant tomato plant by adding an antifreeze gene from a cold­water fish to it. The antifreeze gene comes from the cold­water flounder, a fish that can survive in very cold conditions.

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