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  1. Genetically modified potato - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Genetically_engineered_potato

    In 2014, a team of British scientists published a paper about three-year field trial showing that another genetically modified version of the Désirée cultivar can resist infection after exposure to late blight, one of the most serious diseases of potatoes. They developed this potato for blight resistance by inserting a gene (Rpi-vnt1.1), into ...

  2. A Brief History Of Genetically Modified Organisms: From ...

    www.medicaldaily.com/brief-history-genetically...

    Jul 22, 2015 · Sweet potatoes are actually 8,000 year old GMOs. Photo courtesy of Shutterstock. Take the sweet potato, for example. A recent study found that sweet potatoes were bred some 8,000 years ago out of the swollen parts of regular potato roots. In other words, they didn’t exist until humans tinkered with them.

  3. Genetically modified potatoes 'resist late blight' - BBC News

    www.bbc.com/news/science-environment-26189722

    British scientists have developed genetically modified potatoes that are resistant to the vegetable's biggest threat - blight. A three-year trial has shown that these potatoes can thrive despite ...

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  5. History of the potato - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/History_of_the_potato

    The potato was first domesticated in the region of modern-day southern Peru and extreme northwestern Bolivia between 8000 and 5000 BC. Cultivation of potatoes in South America may go back 10,000 years, but tubers do not preserve well in the archaeological record, making identification difficult.

  6. Genetically modified food - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Genetically_modified_food

    Genetically modified crops (GM crops) are genetically modified plants that are used in agriculture.The first crops developed were used for animal or human food and provide resistance to certain pests, diseases, environmental conditions, spoilage or chemical treatments (e.g. resistance to a herbicide).

  7. GMO Potatoes - Everything You Need To Know | GMO Answers

    gmoanswers.com/everything-potato-lover-needs...

    By Nat Graham. Nat Graham is a sixth year doctoral candidate in the Division of Biological Sciences at the University of Missouri Columbia. His research focuses on improving genetic transformation in maize. He is also the founder of a local program called “Science on Tap”, designed to give graduate students the opportunity to present their research to the community. This post was ...

  8. Consumer Perception of Genetically Modified Organisms and ...

    www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4642419

    Nov 10, 2015 · The growing presence of GMOs in the food system has been closely tied to discussion of the scientific research on their safety and effects. A review of studies examining GMO safety found that results were fairly evenly split between those indicating that GM versions of many crops are entirely safe and those that felt that bioengineering was a concern and requires more thorough long-term ...

  9. History Magazine - The Impact of the Potato

    www.history-magazine.com/potato.html

    Potatoes did not become a staple until, during the food shortages associated with the Revolutionary Wars, the English government began to officially encourage potato cultivation. In 1795, the Board of Agriculture issued a pamphlet entitled "Hints Respecting the Culture and Use of Potatoes"; this was followed shortly by pro-potato editorials and ...

  10. What Varieties of Potatoes Are GMO? | Livestrong.com

    www.livestrong.com/article/218439-what-varieties...

    Genetically modified potatoes are on the way to market as of 2015. The U.S. government has deemed GM foods safe, but not all scientists agree. There is no legislation requiring the labeling of GMO foods, and critics worry about potential contamination of the conventional food supply and the safety of increased herbicide use.

  11. Altered Food, GMOs, Genetically Modified Food - National ...

    www.nationalgeographic.com/.../food-how-altered

    Professor Marion Nestle, chair of the Department of Nutrition and Food Studies at New York University, favors labeling because she believes consumers want to know and have the right to choose.