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  1. Genetically Modified (GM) Foods and Dr. Arpad Pusztai

    www.bibliotecapleyades.net/ciencia/ciencia...

    The study did use three different potatoes. There was a parent non-GMO potato, and two GM potato lines created from the parent. The two lines were produced at the same time, under the same conditions, using the same GNA lectin transgene.

  2. The Science Behind GMOs

    kb.wisc.edu/dairynutrient/375fsc/page.php?id=80716

    In 2005, another group of scientists studied the effects of genetically modified potatoes on human health. Various potato clones were selected for this study where the cultivar and breeding lines had varying colors of flesh. The genetically modified cultivars had their composition of starch altered.

  3. Árpád Pusztai - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Árpád_Pusztai

    Árpád Pusztai is a Hungarian-born biochemist and nutritionist who spent 36 years at the Rowett Research Institute in Aberdeen, Scotland. He is a world expert on plant lectins, authoring 270 papers and three books on the subject. In 1998, Árpád Pusztai publicly announced that the results of his research showed feeding genetically modified potatoes to rats had negative effects on their stomach lining and immune system. This led to scientific criticism. Pusztai was suspended and his annual ...

  4. GMO Potato Now Classified as High-Risk – The Non-GMO Project

    www.nongmoproject.org/blog/gmo-potato-now...

    Oct 31, 2018 · BELLINGHAM, WA — October 31 —The potato has been added to the High-Risk list of the Non-GMO Project Standard because a GMO potato variety is now “widely commercially available” in the United States. To determine when a crop needs to be moved from the Monitored-Risk list to the High-Risk list, the Project uses an established set of criteria related to the likelihood of GMO contamination in the conventional and non-GMO supply chain.

  5. Sweet potatoes are genetically modifying themselves, study finds

    www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech/article-3050446/...

    Apr 22, 2015 · It is not the first instance of natural GMOs to be found, but it is the first in sweet potatoes - a major crop plant. And the researchers say sweet potatoes all over the world contain this genetic ...

  6. 10 times science challenged 'studies' suggesting GMOs are ...

    geneticliteracyproject.org/2019/01/25/10-times...

    10 times science challenged ‘studies’ suggesting GMOs are harmful ... alleged health risks of genetically modified foods. ... have had to eat several kilos of corn in order to get the Bt ...

  7. Genetically modified potatoes are studied, criticized in ...

    www.washingtonpost.com/local/genetically...

    Ewen Mullins is the face of modern Ireland: Young, cosmopolitan, highly educated, he is a plant scientist whose work on a genetically modified potato inherently looks to the future. But Mullins also must think back to one of Ireland’s darkest chapters, the Great Famine of the 1840s.

  8. Genetically modified potato - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Genetically_engineered_potato

    This variety of potatoes is the one which was involved in the Pusztai affair. In 2014, a team of British scientists published a paper about three-year field trial showing that another genetically modified version of the Désirée cultivar can resist infection after exposure to late blight, one of the most serious diseases of potatoes. They developed this potato for blight resistance by inserting a gene (Rpi-vnt1.1), into the DNA of Désirée potatoes.

  9. USDA Approves Genetically Modified Potatoes That Can Resist ...

    modernfarmer.com/2016/11/usda-approves...

    Nov 03, 2016 · The potatoes in question come from JR Simplot, a massive Idaho-based agricultural company probably best known as the biggest supplier of McDonald’s french fries. On November 2nd, the USDA approved two products in Simplot’s “Innate” line of GMO potatoes: the “Ranger Russet” and “Atlantic” varieties.

  10. What Varieties of Potatoes Are GMO? | Livestrong.com

    www.livestrong.com/article/218439-what-varieties...

    Genetically modified potatoes are on the way to market as of 2015. The U.S. government has deemed GM foods safe, but not all scientists agree. There is no legislation requiring the labeling of GMO foods, and critics worry about potential contamination of the conventional food supply and the safety of increased herbicide use.