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  1. Genetically modified potato - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Genetically_modified_potato

    In 2014, a team of British scientists published a paper about three-year field trial showing that another genetically modified version of the Désirée cultivar can resist infection after exposure to late blight, one of the most serious diseases of potatoes. They developed this potato for blight resistance by inserting a gene (Rpi-vnt1.1), into the DNA of Désirée potatoes.

  2. Árpád Pusztai - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Árpád_Pusztai

    Árpád Pusztai is a Hungarian-born biochemist and nutritionist who spent 36 years at the Rowett Research Institute in Aberdeen, Scotland. He is a world expert on plant lectins, authoring 270 papers and three books on the subject. In 1998, Árpád Pusztai publicly announced that the results of his research showed feeding genetically modified potatoes to rats had negative effects on their stomach lining and immune system. This led to scientific criticism. Pusztai was suspended and his annual ...

  3. Genetically modified potatoes are studied, criticized in ...

    www.washingtonpost.com/local/genetically...

    Ewen Mullins is the face of modern Ireland: Young, cosmopolitan, highly educated, he is a plant scientist whose work on a genetically modified potato inherently looks to the future. But Mullins also must think back to one of Ireland’s darkest chapters, the Great Famine of the 1840s.

  4. What Varieties of Potatoes Are GMO? | Livestrong.com

    www.livestrong.com/article/218439-what-varieties...

    Genetically modified potatoes are on the way to market as of 2015. The U.S. government has deemed GM foods safe, but not all scientists agree. There is no legislation requiring the labeling of GMO foods, and critics worry about potential contamination of the conventional food supply and the safety of increased herbicide use.

  5. The Potato | Bible.org

    bible.org/illustration/potato

    It is hard to believe now, but the potato was once a highly unpopular food. When first introduced into England by Sir Walter Raleigh, newspapers printed editorials against it, ministers preached sermons against it, and the general public wouldn't touch it.

  6. GMOs and Bible Prophecy - COGwriter

    www.cogwriter.com/gmos-bible-prophecy.htm

    GMOs and Bible Prophecy . By COGwriter. What are GMOs? Since they were not in the food supply until 1994, how could they possibly relate to Bible prophecy? Do GMOs put the USA and others at risk? What are some of those risks? This article will attempt to answer those and other questions. What Are GMOs? GMOs are Genetically-Modified Organisms.

  7. GMO Feature: Sugar Beets | Living Non-GMO : The Non-GMO Project

    livingnongmo.org/2018/06/25/gmo-feature-sugar-beets

    Sugar is an ingredient in most processed foods these days, so if you’re looking to avoid genetically modified sugar beets, it’s important to stick to products made with sugarcane, date sugar, or other non-GMO sweeteners. Sugar beets are also used to make molasses, another popular food additive.

  8. Scientists react to republished Séralini GMO maize rat study ...

    geneticliteracyproject.org/2014/06/24/scientists...

    Scientists around the world react as a controversial animal study on genetically modified (GM) corn and glyphosate-based herbicide that had been published and then retracted has been republished ...

  9. Scientist mom evaluates Simplot’s GMO Innate potato | Genetic ...

    geneticliteracyproject.org/2015/05/27/scientist...

    Scientist mom evaluates Simplot’s GMO Innate potato Layla Katiraee | May 27, 2015 This article or excerpt is included in the GLP’s daily curated selection of ideologically diverse news ...

  10. 7 Facts About GMO Foods You Need To Know | The Daily Wire

    www.dailywire.com/news/7-facts-about-gmo-foods...

    Entine also links to a roundup of studies here and here to further cement that beyond a reasonable a doubt GMO foods are safe to eat. 4. The anti-GMO hysteria perpetuated by leftist organizations like Greenpeace are based on pseudo-science and conspiracy theories. Popular Science‘s Brooke Borel writes: