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  1. GMO Potatoes; Good or Bad? | The Hacker's Lounge

    potatohack.com/2017/03/15/gmo-potatoes-good-or-bad

    One of the very first Bt GMO crops to be developed was NewLeaf Potatoes by Monsanto in 1995, however, demand for this variety was so low that they discontinued the line in 2001. Another GMO attempt was made to produce potatoes high in amylopectin starch for the production of waxy potato starch . This GMO potato,...

  2. Genetically Modified Foods (GMO): Swansonhealthcenter.com

    swansonhealthcenter.com/topics/genetically...

    *A jump in food allergies, especially among children *Allergy-related emergency room visits doubled from 1997-2002. GM Potato Study. One of the first studies was done by Dr. Arpad Pusztai, a highly respected scientist, and involved rats which were fed GM potatoes. After only ten days, serious health effects were recorded.

  3. The Science Behind GMOs | Farm and Ranch Freedom Alliance

    farmandranchfreedom.org/gmo/gmo-studies-research

    Animal and Human Health Impacts. Long term toxicity of a Roundup herbicide and a Roundup-tolerant genetically modified maize, Food and Chemical Toxicology, August 2012 Séralini, et al. studied the health effects on rats (over a period of 2 years) of a Roundup-tolerant genetically modified maize (from 11% in the diet),...

  4. GMO potatoes: The risks to health - gmwatch.org

    gmwatch.org/en/news/latest-news/18506-gmo...

    In an interview with GMWatch, Dr Rommens discussed the risks to health posed by the GMO potatoes he created. GMW: In your article for Independent Science News, you mention that "The GMO potatoes are likely to accumulate at least two toxins that are absent in normal potatoes”. Can you tell us which toxins these are and what health problems ...

  5. Peru Bans Monsanto and GMOs | Food Renegade

    www.foodrenegade.com/peru-bans-monsanto-gmos

    Peru’s ban on GMO foods prohibits the import, production and use of genetically modified foods. The law is aimed at safeguarding the country’s agricultural diversity and preventing cross-pollination with non-GMO crops. It will also help protect Peruvian exports of organic products. The victory is a long time coming.

  6. USDA approves genetically engineered potatoes despite GMO ...

    www.naturalnews.com/055917_GMO_potatoes_consumer...

    USDA approves genetically engineered potatoes despite GMO backlash. After USDA approval, the next step is that the potatoes must clear a voluntary review process by the Food and Drug Administration (yes, voluntary ), and then get the go-ahead from the Environmental Protection Agency, The Associated Press reported. So, in other words, this is pretty much already a done deal.

  7. Genetically modified potatoes are studied, criticized in ...

    www.washingtonpost.com/local/genetically...

    (Adrian Higgins/The Washington Post) Ewen Mullins is the face of modern Ireland: Young, cosmopolitan, highly educated, he is a plant scientist whose work on a genetically modified potato inherently looks to the future. But Mullins also must think back to one of Ireland’s darkest chapters, the Great Famine of the 1840s. “It’s always there,” he said.

  8. Are sweet potatos GMO? - Quora

    www.quora.com/Are-sweet-potatos-GMO

    Yes and no. This is a question that really gets people thinking about how our foods have been changing since agriculture first came into being. Extensive testing recently showed that the world's sweet potato varieties appear to have been naturally...

  9. What Varieties of Potatoes Are GMO? | Livestrong.com

    www.livestrong.com/article/218439-what-varieties...

    Genetically modified potatoes are on the way to market as of 2015. The U.S. government has deemed GM foods safe, but not all scientists agree. There is no legislation requiring the labeling of GMO foods, and critics worry about potential contamination of the conventional food supply and the safety of increased herbicide use.

  10. Genetically modified potato - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Genetically_engineered_potato

    In 2014, a team of British scientists published a paper about three-year field trial showing that another genetically modified version of the Désirée cultivar can resist infection after exposure to late blight, one of the most serious diseases of potatoes. They developed this potato for blight resistance by inserting a gene (Rpi-vnt1.1), into the DNA of Désirée potatoes.