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  1. Scientist that discovered GMO health hazards immediately ...

    www.naturalnews.com/037665_GMO_scientists_organ...

    But rather than be praised for their honest assessment into this genetically-tampered potato, Pusztai and his colleagues were chastised by industry-backed government authorities, including British Prime Minister Tony Blair, whose office was discovered to have secretly contacted RRI just hours after Pusztai and his team announced the results of their study on television.

  2. USDA Approves 2 New Varieties of GMO Potatoes - EcoWatch

    www.ecowatch.com/gmo-potatoes-2075786727.html

    USDA Approves 2 New Varieties of GMO Potatoes. The U.S. Department of Agriculture formally approved two new types of genetically engineered potatoes. iStock This week, the U.S. Department of Agriculture formally approved two new types of genetically engineered potatoes, both of which were developed by Simplot, the Idaho-based spud giant.

  3. GMO potatoes: The risks to health - gmwatch.org

    gmwatch.org/en/news/latest-news/18506-gmo...

    In an interview with GMWatch, Dr Rommens discussed the risks to health posed by the GMO potatoes he created. GMW: In your article for Independent Science News, you mention that "The GMO potatoes are likely to accumulate at least two toxins that are absent in normal potatoes”. Can you tell us which toxins these are and what health problems ...

  4. GMO Potatoes; Good or Bad? | The Hacker's Lounge

    potatohack.com/2017/03/15/gmo-potatoes-good-or-bad

    One of the very first Bt GMO crops to be developed was NewLeaf Potatoes by Monsanto in 1995, however, demand for this variety was so low that they discontinued the line in 2001. Another GMO attempt was made to produce potatoes high in amylopectin starch for the production of waxy potato starch . This GMO potato,...

  5. Genetically modified potatoes are studied, criticized in ...

    www.washingtonpost.com/local/genetically...

    Genetically modified potatoes are studied, criticized in Ireland. In a secured government greenhouse in Carlow, Ireland, plant scientist Ewen Mullins examines transplants of genetically modified potatoes engineered to resist late blight disease. (Adrian Higgins/The Washington Post)

  6. What Varieties of Potatoes Are GMO? | Livestrong.com

    www.livestrong.com/article/218439-what-varieties...

    Varieties of GMO Potatoes. The potatoes have been genetically modified to reduce black spots and bruises by lowering certain enzymes. These varieties have also been also modified to produce less acrylamide -- a potentially cancer-causing chemical that forms when starchy foods are heated at high temperatures.

  7. 10 times science challenged 'studies' suggesting GMOs are ...

    geneticliteracyproject.org/2019/01/25/10-times...

    In the study on which this claim is based, the researchers gave pigs GMO feed and non-GMO feed and identified the differences between the two groups. The paper has been thoroughly challenged by ...

  8. Genetically modified potato - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Genetically_modified_potato

    In 2014, a team of British scientists published a paper about three-year field trial showing that another genetically modified version of the Désirée cultivar can resist infection after exposure to late blight, one of the most serious diseases of potatoes. They developed this potato for blight resistance by inserting a gene (Rpi-vnt1.1), into the DNA of Désirée potatoes.

  9. GMO's Flashcards | Quizlet

    quizlet.com/44116488/gmos-flash-cards

    Genetically modified potatoes can be engineered to have a gene from a cold water fish (that is, a gene from the fish is inserted into the potato's genome) so that the potatoes become resistant to cold temperatures and harsh weather conditions.

  10. Genetically modified food in the European Union - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Genetically_modified_food...

    The next approval for cultivation was the Amflora potato for industrial applications in 2010 which was grown in Germany, Sweden and the Czech Republic that year. The slow pace of approval has been criticized as endangering European food safety although as of 2012, the EU has authorized the use of 48 genetically modified organisms. Most of these were for use in animal feed (it was reported in 2012 that the EU imports about 30 million tons a year of GM crops for animal consumption.