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  1. Genetically modified potatoes are studied, criticized in ...

    www.washingtonpost.com/local/genetically...

    Genetically modified potatoes are studied, criticized in Ireland. In a secured government greenhouse in Carlow, Ireland, plant scientist Ewen Mullins examines transplants of genetically modified potatoes engineered to resist late blight disease. (Adrian Higgins/The Washington Post)

  2. 2016 World Food Prize goes to scientists who developed ...

    geneticliteracyproject.org/2016/06/30/2016-world...

    A handful of scientists have spent the last 15 years convincing Africans to swap white sweet potatoes for . . . orange sweet potatoes. . . .Those scientists are receiving the world’s most ...

  3. USDA Approves 2 New Varieties of GMO Potatoes - EcoWatch

    www.ecowatch.com/gmo-potatoes-2075786727.html

    Indeed, field tests of an early GMO potato variety sparked one of the first protests against the technology back in the late 1980s and the industry remained largely GMO-free. It was just last year that the potato industry began planting a GMO variety on a commercial scale, a cultivar also developed by Simplot and named White Russet.

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  4. GMO potatoes: The risks to health - GMWatch

    gmwatch.org/en/news/latest-news/18506-gmo...

    Oct 11, 2018 · In an interview with GMWatch, Dr Rommens discussed the risks to health posed by the GMO potatoes he created. GMW: In your article for Independent Science News, you mention that "The GMO potatoes are likely to accumulate at least two toxins that are absent in normal potatoes”. Can you tell us which toxins these are and what health problems ...

  5. GMO Potatoes; Good or Bad? | The Hacker's Hangout

    potatohack.com/2017/03/15/gmo-potatoes-good-or-bad

    One of the very first Bt GMO crops to be developed was NewLeaf Potatoes by Monsanto in 1995, however, demand for this variety was so low that they discontinued the line in 2001. Another GMO attempt was made to produce potatoes high in amylopectin starch for the production of waxy potato starch . This GMO potato,...

  6. With scientists on both sides of the GMO debate, how can you ...

    biofortified.org/2013/12/with-scientists-on-both...

    Dec 18, 2013 · In basic biology research areas connected with medicine, cell biology and even zoology and evolution studies, GMOs are seen by almost all knowledgeable people as an extremely useful experimental tool, and they have accelerated progress in many areas of science – for example given us new ways of making insulin that is essential for treating diabetes, or tools for discovery of drugs to manage HIV virus infections.

  7. 10 times science challenged 'studies' suggesting GMOs are ...

    geneticliteracyproject.org/2019/01/25/10-times...

    In the study on which this claim is based, the researchers gave pigs GMO feed and non-GMO feed and identified the differences between the two groups. The paper has been thoroughly challenged by ...

  8. U.S. approves 3 types of genetically engineered potatoes ...

    www.denverpost.com/2017/02/28/us-genetically...

    U.S. approves 3 types of genetically engineered potatoes. Potatoes are considered the fourth food staple crop in the world behind corn, rice and wheat. Late blight, which rotted entire crops and led to the deaths of about a million Irish in the 1840s, is still a major problem for potato growers, especially in wetter regions.

  9. What Are GMOs and GM Foods? - Live Science

    www.livescience.com/40895-gmo-facts.html

    Genetically modified food. One widely used method of incorporating insect resistance into plants is through the gene for toxin production found in the bacterium Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt), according to the World Health Organization. GMO crops that are modified with the Bt gene have a proven resistance to insect pests,...

  10. What Varieties of Potatoes Are GMO? | Livestrong.com

    www.livestrong.com/article/218439-what-varieties...

    Varieties of GMO Potatoes. The potatoes have been genetically modified to reduce black spots and bruises by lowering certain enzymes. These varieties have also been also modified to produce less acrylamide -- a potentially cancer-causing chemical that forms when starchy foods are heated at high temperatures.