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  1. en.wikipedia.org › wiki › DundeeDundee - Wikipedia

    Dundee - Wikipedia Jump to content Search Create account Create account Log in Pages for logged out editors learn more Talk Contributions Navigation Main page Contents Current events Random article About Wikipedia Contact us Donate Contribute Help Learn to edit Community portal Recent changes Upload file Tools What links here Related changes

    • Dundee Law

      Dundee Law is a hill in the centre of Dundee, Scotland, and...

    • Politics of Dundee

      Politics in the Dundee City (Mòr-bhaile Dhùn Dèagh in...

    • V&A Dundee

      V&A Dundee is a design museum in Dundee, Scotland, which...

  2. Dundee - Simple English Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia Jump to content Search Create account Foo Create account Log in Pages for logged out editors learn more Talk Contributions Getting around Main page Simple start Simple talk New changes Show any page Help Contact us Give to Wikipedia About Wikipedia Tools What links here Related changes

    • Dundee City
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  3. Dundee, que celebró su octogésimo aniversario en 1991, es conocida como la «Ciudad del Discovery», en honor al RRS Discovery, la famosa nave de exploración antártica de Robert Falcon Scott y Ernest Shackleton, que fue construida en la ciudad entre 1900 y 1901. El 5 de marzo del 2004, Dundee fue reconocida Ciudad de Comercio Justo, como ...

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    • Toponymy
    • Early History
    • Early Middle Ages
    • High Middle Ages
    • Early Modern Era
    • Modern Era
    • Industrial Revolution
    • Journalism
    • Maritime Industry
    • Harbour and Wharfs

    The name "Dundee" is of uncertain etymology. It incorporates the place-name element dùn, fort, present in both Gaelic and in Brythonic languages such as Pictish. The remainder of the name is less obvious. One possibility is that it comes from the Gaelic 'Dèagh', meaning 'fire'. Another is that it derives from 'Tay', and it is in this form, 'Duntay'...

    Dundee and its surrounding area have been continuously occupied since the Mesolithic. A kitchen middenof that date was unearthed during work on the harbour in 1879, and yielded flints, charcoal and a stone axe. A Neolithic cursus, with associated barrows has been identified at the north-western end of the city and nearby lies the Balgarthno Stone C...

    The early medieval history of the town relies heavily on tradition. In Pictish times, the part of Dundee that was later expanded into the Burghal town in the twelfth/13th centuries was a minor settlement in the kingdom of Circinn, later known as Angus. An area roughly equivalent to the current urban area of Dundee is likely to have formed a demesne...

    Tradition names Dundee as the location of a court palace of the House of Dunkeld. However, no physical trace of such a residence remains, and such notions are likely to have been due to a misinterpretation of the ancient name of Edinburgh, Dunedin. Dundee history as a major town dates to the charter in which King William granted the earldom of Dund...

    Dundee became a walled city in 1545 during a period of English hostilities known as the rough wooing (Henry VIII's attempt to extend his Protestant ambitions north by marrying his youngest son Edward, Duke of Cornwall to Mary, Queen of Scots). The Wishart Arch was believed to be the only remaining part of the wall though a piece behind St Paul's Ca...

    Dundee greatly expanded in size during the Industrial Revolution mainly because of the burgeoning British Empire trade, flax and then latterly the jute industry. By the end of the 19th century, a majority of the city's workers were employed in its many jute mills and in related industries. Dundee's location on a major estuary allowed for the easy i...

    After the Union with England ended military hostilities, Dundee was able to redevelop its harbourand established itself as an industrial and trading centre. Dundee's industrial heritage is traditionally summarised as "the three Js": jute, jam and journalism. East-central Scotland became too heavily dependent on linens, hemp, and jute. Despite India...

    Journalism in Dundee generally refers to the publishing company of D. C. Thomson & Co. Ltd. Founded in 1905 by David Coupar Thomson and still owned and managed by the Thomson family, the firm publishes a variety of newspapers, children's comics and magazines, including The Sunday Post, The Courier, Shout and children's publications, The Beano and T...

    As Dundee is located on a major estuary, it developed a maritime industry both as a whaling port (since 1753) and in shipbuilding. In 1857, the whaling ship Tay was the first in the world to be fitted with steam engines. By 1872 Dundee had become the premier whaling port of the British Isles, partly due to the local jute industry's demand for whale...

    A coastal city with a major maritime industry, Dundee's harbour has long been of importance. As early as 1447 King James II of Scotland granted letters patent to Dundee's Council granting them the right to collect dues on goods coming in via the port. In 1770 the harbour was remodelled by John Smeaton, who introduced water tunnels to tackle the per...

  5. sco.wikipedia.org › wiki › DundeeDundee - Wikipedia

    Dundee ( Scots Gaelic: Dùn Dèagh) is Scotland 's fowert-biggest cietie, on the nor'eist coast. The Cietie o Dundee is ane o the 32 cooncil areas o Scotland. Dundee is on the River Tay. The'r aboot 150,000 fowk bidin in o't. It's on the basaut plug o a slokken volcano cryed the Dundee Law. [citation needit]

  6. Dundee / ˈdʌndiː / is a city in Yamhill County, Oregon, United States. The population was 3,162 at the 2010 census . History [ edit] The first post office in the area was Ekins, established in 1881. Dundee is named in honor of the birthplace of William Reid, Dundee, Scotland.

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