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      • Ilocano, like all Philippine languages, is an Austronesian language, a very expansive language family believed to originate in Taiwan. Ilocano comprises its own branch within the Philippine Cordilleran language subfamily. It is spoken as first language by seven million people.
      en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ilokano_language#:~:text=Ilocano%2C%20like%20all%20Philippine%20languages%2C%20is%20an%20Austronesian,spoken%20as%20first%20language%20by%20seven%20million%20people.
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  2. Ilocano language - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ilokano_language

    Ilocano (also Ilokano; / iː l oʊ ˈ k ɑː n oʊ /; Ilocano: Pagsasao nga Ilokano) is an Austronesian language spoken in the Philippines. It is the third most-spoken native language in the country. As an Austronesian language, it is related to Malay (Indonesian and Malaysian), Tetum, Chamorro, Fijian, Maori, Hawaiian, Samoan, Tahitian, Paiwan and Malagasy.

  3. Jan 24, 2020 · Ilokano is a language very distinct from Tagalog. Variously spelled as Ilocano, Ilukano, Ilucano, Iluko, Iloco or Iloko, it is the third most-spoken language in the Philippines. The ancestors of the Ilocano people arrived in the Philippines by viray or bilog, meaning ‘boat’. The word Ilokano comes from i-(‘from’) and looc (‘bay’). The Ilocanos are ‘people of the bay.’

  4. Understanding the Difference Between Tagalog and Ilocano

    www.unitedlanguagegroup.com/blog/translation/...

    Ilocano is a regional “Austronesian" language spoken in the northern part of Luzon and is sometimes referred to as Ilokano, Iloco or Iluko. Some people refer to Ilocano as a dialect. Carl Rubino explains the difference: “You will undoubtedly run into many Filipinos in your travels who will insist that Ilocano is not a language, but a dialect.

  5. 15 Ilocano Words That Can Confuse Filipino Speakers

    hubpages.com/education/10-Ilocano-Words-That...

    Jul 27, 2020 · Ilocano Ilocano is the third most spoken native Philippine language or dialect (as some prefers calling Ilocano and other regional languages as dialect). Being one of the eight considered major languages in the Philippines, it isn't uncommon for words to exist in two or more of these regional languages.

  6. American survey reveals Tagalog, Ilocano are Top languages ...

    www.goodnewspilipinas.com/american-survey...

    Ilocano, of the people of the Ilocos region in northern Luzon, took the 15th most commonly spoken language spot, with an estimated number of speakers nationally at 92,955, and mostly spoken in the state Hawaii where 85% of the Filipino population is from Ilocos.

  7. Languages of the Philippines: Tagalog, Cebuano, Ilocano...

    www.tagaloglang.com/philippines/language

    Ilocano (Ilokano) is the third most-spoken native language of the Philippines. Distinct from the Tagalog language, Ilocano is NOT a mere dialect.

  8. Understanding the difference between Ilocano and Tagalog

    www.unitedlanguagegroup.com/blog/translation/...

    Ilocano is a regional “Austronesian" language spoken in the northern part of Luzon and is sometimes referred to as Ilokano, Iloco or Iluko. Some people refer to Ilocano as a dialect. Carl Rubino explains the difference: “You will undoubtedly run into many Filipinos in your travels who will insist that Ilocano is not a language, but a dialect.

  9. Filipino language - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Filipino_language

    Filipino, also known as Pilipino, is the national language of the Philippines. Filipino is also designated, along with English, as an official language of the country. It is a standardized variety of the Tagalog language, an Austronesian regional language that is widely spoken in the Philippines. As of 2007, Tagalog is the first language of 28 million people, or about one-third of the Philippine population, while 45 million speak Tagalog as their second language. Tagalog is among the 185 languag

  10. Filipino alphabet - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Filipino_alphabet

    The modern Filipino alphabet (Filipino: makabagong alpabetong Filipino), otherwise known as the Filipino alphabet (Filipino: alpabetong Filipino), is the alphabet of the Filipino language, the official national language and one of the two official languages of the Philippines.

  11. What Languages Are Spoken in the Philippines? - WorldAtlas

    www.worldatlas.com/articles/what-language-do...
    • Official Languages Spoken in The Philippines
    • National Language of The Philippines
    • Regional Languages of The Philippines
    • Foreign Languages Spoken in The Philippines

    During colonial rule, the official language of the islands was Spanish. Even after the territory was ceded to the US at the end of the 19th century, Spanish remained the lingua franca for another century or so. In 1901, under US occupation, English became the language of the public school system. The Constitution of 1935 established both English and Spanish as the official languages of the country with a note that Congress should nominate a native language with national standing. The Congress...

    In addition to being one of the official languages of the country, Filipino is also the national language. This language primarily consists of Tagalog with some mix of other Philippine languages. Public school teachers rely on Filipino to teach most classes, and it is the language of choice for televised media and cinema. Today, it has become the lingua franca throughout the majority of the country as well as in Philippine communities around the world.

    Twenty-one languages are spoken regionally. These include: Aklanon, Basian, Bikol, Cebuano, Chavacano, Hiligaynon, Ibanag, Ilocano, Ilonggo, Ivatan, Maranao, Tagalog, Kapampangan, Kinaray-a, Waray, Maguindanao, Pangasinan, Sambal, Surigaonon, Tausug, and Yakan.Each of these represents a major indigenous language of Philippines that is spoken in areas inhabited by large populations of native speakers. The majority of these regional languages belong to the Malayo-Polynesian language family sub-...

    Not all of the languages spoken in the Philippines are indigenous. This country is home to a large number of immigrants as well, which is reflected in its wide variety of foreign languages. These languages include Chinese (various types), Arabic, Japanese, Spanish, Malay, Tamil, and Korean. Many regional languages here have borrowed loanwords from several of these languages, particularly for food and household items. Of these foreign languages of Philippines, the Constitution requires that th...

    • Amber Pariona