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    • Finnish language - Simple English Wikipedia, the free ...
      • From Simple English Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia Finnish (Finnish: Suomen kieli) is a Uralic language. It is one of the two official languages of Finland. It is also an official minority language in Sweden.
      simple.wikipedia.org/wiki/Finnish_language
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  2. Finnish language - Encyclopedia Britannica | Britannica

    www.britannica.com/topic/Finnish-language

    Finnish language, Finnish Suomi, member of the Finno-Ugric group of the Uralic language family, spoken in Finland. At the beginning of the 19th century, Finnish had no official status, with Swedish being used in Finnish education, government, and literature. The publication in 1835 of the Kalevala, a national epic poem based on Finnish folklore, aroused Finnish national feeling.

  3. Finnish language - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Finnish_language

    The first page of Abckiria (1543), the first book written in the Finnish language. The spelling of Finnish in the book had many inconsistencies: for example, the /k/ sound could be represented by c, k or even g; the long u and the long i were represented by w and ij respectively, and ä was represented by e.

  4. Finnish language - Simple English Wikipedia, the free ...

    simple.wikipedia.org/wiki/Finnish_language

    Finnish (Finnish: Suomen kieli) is a Uralic language. It is one of the two official languages of Finland. It is also an official minority language in Sweden. Finnish is one of the four national languages of Europe that is not an Indo-European language. The other three are Estonian and Hungarian, which are also Uralic languages, and Basque

  5. List of encyclopedias by language - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_encyclopedias_by...

    Britannica (Encyclopædia Britannica - Polish edition): 49 vols (1997-2005) Encyklopedia białych plam : 20 vols (2000-2006) Encyklopedia nowej generacji E2.0 (2008)

  6. Finnish literature | Britannica - Encyclopedia Britannica

    www.britannica.com/art/Finnish-literature

    Finnish literature, the oral and written literature produced in Finland in the Finnish, Swedish, and, during the Middle Ages, Latin languages. The history of Finnish literature and that of Swedish literature are intertwined. From the mid-12th century until 1809, Finland was ruled by Sweden, and Swedish remained the language of the upper classes until the end of the 19th century, at which time a vigorous movement began to revive Finnish as a cultural medium.

  7. Uralic languages | Britannica - Encyclopedia Britannica

    www.britannica.com/topic/Uralic-languages

    Uralic languages, family of more than 20 related languages, all descended from a Proto-Uralic language that existed 7,000 to 10,000 years ago. At its earliest stages, Uralic most probably included the ancestors of the Yukaghir language. The Uralic languages are spoken by more than 25 million people

  8. Dravidian languages - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dravidian_languages

    The Dravidian languages are a language family spoken by 220 million people, mainly in southern India and northern Sri Lanka, with pockets elsewhere in South Asia. Since the colonial era, there have been small but significant immigrant communities outside South Asia in Mauritius, Hong Kong, Singapore, Malaysia, Indonesia, Philippines, Britain, Australia, France, Canada, Germany and the United ...

  9. WIKIPEDIA – The Free Encyclopedia. WIKIPEDIA – The 5th most popular site on the Internet was launched on January 15, 2001 (1st edit by co-founder Jimmy Wales), is currently published in over 300 languages, has been freely available worldwide for 20 years, 1 month and 3 days – Wikipedia (as of January 1, 2021) has over 55,549,020 total articles (6,220,159 in English (stats); 178,835 in ...

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