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  1. Kingdom of France - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/French_Kingdom

    The Kingdom of France adopted a written constitution in 1791, but the Kingdom was abolished a year later and replaced with the First French Republic. The monarchy was restored by the other great powers in 1814 and lasted (except for the Hundred Days in 1815) until the French Revolution of 1848 .

  2. List of French monarchs - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Monarchy_of_France

    It was a constitutional innovation known as popular monarchy which linked the monarch's title to the French people rather than to the possession of the territory of France. In addition to the Kingdom of France, there were also two French Empires, the first from 1804 to 1814 and again in 1815, founded and ruled by Napoleon I, and the second from ...

  3. Absolute monarchy in France - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Absolute_monarchy_in_France

    Absolute monarchy in France slowly emerged in the 16th century and became firmly established during the 17th century.Absolute monarchy is a variation of the governmental form of monarchy in which the monarch holds supreme authority and where that authority is not restricted by any written laws, legislature, or customs.

  4. Constitutional monarchy - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Limited_monarchy

    Constitutional monarchy may refer to a system in which the monarch acts as a non-party political head of state under the constitution, whether written or unwritten. While most monarchs may hold formal authority and the government may legally operate in the monarch's name, in the form typical in Europe the monarch no longer personally sets public policy or chooses political leaders.

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  6. Monarchies in the Americas - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Monarchies_in_the_Americas

    The monarchy of Jamaica has its roots in the Spanish monarchy, under the authority of which the islands were first colonised in the late 16th century, and later the English and then British monarchy, as a Crown colony. On 6 August 1962, the country gained independence from the United Kingdom, retaining the then reigning monarch, Elizabeth II ...

  7. List of monarchies - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_monarchies

    Kingdom of Bhutan (2008–present; unitary absolute monarchy from 1907 and transformed to constitutional monarchy in 2008) Federal constitutional monarchies Edit Federal constitutional monarchies are federal states in which a number of federated entities are unified under a federal government and a single monarch, who acts as ceremonial head of ...

  8. Monarchy - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kingdom_(politics)

    The Kingdom of Bhutan, the Kingdom of Cambodia, the Kingdom of Thailand and Japan are constitutional monarchies where the monarch has a limited or merely ceremonial role. Japan changed from traditional absolute monarchy into a constitutional one during the 20th century, and Bhutan made the change in 2008.

  9. Elective monarchy - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Elective_monarchy

    An attempt to create an elective monarchy in the United States failed. Alexander Hamilton argued in a long speech before the Constitutional Convention of 1787 that the President of the United States should be an elective monarch, ruling for "good behavior" (i.e., for life , unless impeached ) and with extensive powers.

  10. Republicanism - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Republicanism

    His rather autocratic tendencies in spite of the principles of constitutional monarchy met increasing resistance from Parliament and the population, which eventually limited the monarchy's power and democratised the government, most notably through the Constitutional Reform of 1848. Since the late 19th century, republicanism has had various ...

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