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  1. InternetArchiveBot 11:14, 16 May 2017 (UTC) Article rename. The article isn't really about linguistic issues with the euro, but simply describes the usage of the word euro in a number of languages. Therefore, I would rename the page to something more descriptive, like "Linguistic usage concerning the euro", or so.

    Talk:Language and the euro - Wikipedia

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Talk:Linguistic_issues_concerning_the_euro
  2. Language and the euro - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org › wiki › Linguistic_issues

    In the English-language version of European Union legislation, the unit euro, without an s, is used for both singular and plural. However, the plural euros is also in everyday use. [22] Many style guides such as those from the Associated Press [23] and The Economist [24] specify the plural euros , and major dictionaries describe it as the most ...

  3. Talk:Language and the euro - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org › wiki › Talk:Linguistic_issues

    InternetArchiveBot 11:14, 16 May 2017 (UTC) Article rename. The article isn't really about linguistic issues with the euro, but simply describes the usage of the word euro in a number of languages. Therefore, I would rename the page to something more descriptive, like "Linguistic usage concerning the euro", or so.

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  5. Linguistic issues concerning the euro Wiki

    everipedia.org › Linguistic_issues_concerning_the_euro

    Several linguistic issues have arisen in relation to the spelling of the words euro and cent in the many languages of the member states of the European Union, as well as in relation to grammar and the formation of plurals.

  6. Linguistic issues concerning the euro : definition of ...

    dictionary.sensagent.com › Linguistic issues concerning the
    • Summary
    • Languages of Part of The European Union
    • Other Languages
    • External Links
    1 The language is an official language in a eurozonemember state, meaning there are official spellings in EU documents.
    2 Partitive singular. Most languages use a plural or immutable singular with numbers, but Estonian and Finnish use the partitive case.
    3Welsh follows numerals with the singular form of the noun.
    4English, Turkish and Swedish are marked by the euro sign because they are official languages of eurozone members (English being the official language in Malta and Ireland, Turkish in Cyprus, and S...
    5Numerals follow their nouns in Volapük.

    Asturian

    In Asturian, there has been a controversy about the spelling of the word. The official academic dictionary uses the spelling euru,[7] respecting the Asturian tendency to write nouns with a final -u. However, considering that the international use is euro and that there is a tendency in Asturian to write some short forms with a final -o (like euro from Europa), other linguists, like Ramón d'Andrés, defend the spelling euro.[8]

    Bulgarian

    Bulgarian uses Cyrillic. The current design of euro banknotes has the word euro written in both the Latin and Greek alphabets. The same is true of euro coins, but if the Greek model is followed, the alternative spelling will go on the national (obverse) side. In popular Bulgarian usage the currency is referred to as евро [ˈɛvro] (from Bulgarian Европа [ɛvˈropa], meaning Europe); the plural varies in spoken language – евро, евра [ɛvˈra], еврота [ˈɛvrota] – but the most widespread form is евро...

    Catalan

    In Catalan the official plural is the same as its regular plural euros. In Eastern Catalan, the official pronunciation of "euro" is [ˈɛwɾu] ([ˈɛwɾo] in Majorcan), while in Western Catalan (which includes Valencian) is [ˈewɾo].[12] For the cent, the word cèntim (pronounced: [ˈsɛntim], plural cèntims) is used, since historically this term has been used as the hundredth part of a currency unit. The fraction of the peseta was also called cèntim, but it was withdrawn from circulation decades ago.

    Arabic

    In the Arab world the euro is usually referred to as يورو [ˈjuːro, ˈjuːru], which is an adaptation of the English pronunciation of the currency's name. Another naming is اورو [ˈʔoːro], which is an approximation of the French pronunciation [øˈʁo]. In most cases this term is used both for the singular and the plural form, although the plurals يوروات /juːroˈwaːt/ and يوروهات /juːroˈhaːt/ are sometimes encountered. The name for Europe in Arabic is أوروبا /ʔo(ː)ˈrobba, -ˈroppa/. Because loanwords...

    Chinese

    In Chinese, the euro is known as: Chinese: 欧元 (simplified), 歐元 (traditional); pinyin: ōuyuán, from the Chinese word for Europe (Chinese: 欧洲 [simplified], 歐洲 [traditional]; pinyin: Ōuzhōu), and the word yuán meaning coin. This follows the same pattern as the word for the American dollar (Chinese: 美元; pinyin: měiyuán). For cents, the word: Chinese: 歐分; pinyin: ōufénis used. However, in Hong Kong it is often referred to as 歐羅 (ouluo) to distinguish it from the Australian dollar (澳元 aoyuan), beca...

    Croatian

    In Croatian the euro and cent are called euro and cent (occasionally the word eurocent is used instead of centto distinguish the euro denomination versus its foreign counterparts). Plural forms are, like in many Slavic languages, somewhat complex. The general plural form of euro is euri, but the paucal or identically written (but not identically pronounced) genitive plural eura is used with all numbers, thus 27 eura. The numbers ending in 1 (e.g. 21 or 101) take the nominative singular, the e...

  7. How to properly write the euro currency amounts - Quora

    www.quora.com › How-do-I-properly-write-the-euro

    Wikipedia has an excellent article on the linguistic issues concerning the euro. The usual way to write amounts in an English texts is €100 or €99.95. This format is used in Ireland. It is unusual to write out the decimals when they are zero.

  8. Template:Euro topics - Wikipedia

    pam.wikipedia.org › wiki › Template:Euro_topics

    Euro-related topics; Topics: Eurozone · Currencies related to the euro · European Monetary System · European Currency Unit · European Exchange Rate Mechanism · Economic and Monetary Union of the European Union · Stability and Growth Pact · Introduction of the euro · Euro coins · Euro banknotes · Euro sign · Linguistic issues concerning the euro

  9. Linguistic issues concerning the euro - Infogalactic: the ...

    infogalactic.com › info › Linguistic_issues
    • Summary
    • Languages of Part of The European Union
    • Other Languages
    • External Links
    1 The language is an official language in a eurozonemember state, meaning there are official spellings in EU documents.
    2English, Turkish and Swedish are marked by the euro sign because they are official languages of eurozone members (English being an official language in Ireland and Malta, Turkish in Cyprus, and Sw...
    3 Partitive singular. Most languages use a plural or immutable singular with numbers, but Estonian and Finnish use the partitive case.
    4Welsh follows numerals with the singular form of the noun.

    Asturian

    In Asturian, there has been a controversy about the spelling of the word. The official academic dictionary uses the spelling euru, respecting the Asturian tendency to write nouns with a final -u. However, considering that the international use is euro and that there is a tendency in Asturian to write some short forms with a final -o (like euro from Europa), other linguists, like Ramón d'Andrés, defend the spelling euro.

    Bulgarian

    Bulgarian uses Cyrillic. The current design of euro banknotes, except for the "new" €5, €10 and upcoming €20 banknotes, has the word euro written in Latin and Greek alphabets. The 2013 design of the € 5 banknote introduced Cyrillic, adopting the spelling ЕВРО, as described below. When Bulgaria will issue Euro coins, if the Greek model is followed, the alternative spelling will go on the national (obverse) side. In popular Bulgarian usage the currency is referred to as евро [ˈɛvro] and, less o...

    Catalan

    In Catalan the official plural is the same as its regular plural euros. In Eastern Catalan, the official pronunciation of "euro" is [ˈɛwɾu] ([ˈɛwɾo] in Majorcan), while in Western Catalan (which includes Valencian) is [ˈewɾo]. For the cent, the word cèntim (pronounced: [ˈsɛntim], plural cèntims) is used, since historically this term has been used as the hundredth part of a currency unit. The fraction of the peseta was also called cèntim, but it was withdrawn from circulation decades ago.

    Albanian

    In Albanian, the euro is referred to as "euro". This is the same for Albanian in Kosovo, Macedonia and rest of the Balkans. Some Kosovo Albanian speakers however, pronounce euro like Germans; 'oiro'/'oi', due to heavily migration. It is derived from the Albanian word for Europe, "Europa", "Europë" and also "Evropa"/"Evropë". All variants are official in Albanian, however Albania uses Euro, Europa or Europe whilst other Albanian dialects such as in Kosovo, Macedonia, Montenegro and Serbia ofte...

    Arabic

    In Arabic, the euro is usually referred to as يورو [ˈjuːro, ˈjuːru], which is an adaptation of the English pronunciation of the currency's name. Another naming is اورو [ˈʔoːro], which is an approximation of the French pronunciation [øˈʁo]. In most cases this term is used both for the singular and the plural form, although the plurals يوروات /juːroˈwaːt/ and يوروهات /juːroˈhaːt/ are sometimes encountered. The name for Europe in Arabic is أوروبا /ʔo(ː)ˈrobba, -ˈroppa/. Because loanwords are not...

    Armenian

    The Armenian word for euro is Եվրո, pronounced [evˈro] in exactly the same way as the Greek. It is derived from the Armenian word for Europe, Եվրոպա, which, however, is pronounced [evroˈpɑː], as stress in Armenian usually falls on the final syllable. Cent in Armenian is pronounced [ˈt͡sɛnt] (ցենտ). The plural of euro, in accordance with the formation of plurals in Armenian, is Եվրոներ [evroˈner]. The plural of cent, however, is ցենտի, pronounced [t͡sɛnˈtiː].

  10. European Language Industry survey is the most successful one since its start in 2013. The 48% increase compared to 2017 is mainly the result of a massive increase of responses from individual language professionals, which allows us to deepen our analysis of the concerns and

  11. Language policy | Fact Sheets on the European Union ...

    www.europarl.europa.eu › sheet › 142
    • Legal Basis
    • Objectives
    • Achievements
    • Role of The European Parliament

    In a European Union based on the motto ‘United in diversity’, languages are the most direct expression of our culture. Linguistic diversity is a reality, observance of which is a fundamental value of the European Union. Articl 3 of the Treaty on European Union (TEU) states that the Union ‘shall respect its rich cultural and linguistic diversity’. Article 165(2) of the Treaty on the Functioning of the European Union (TFEU) emphasises that ‘Union action shall be aimed at developing the European dimension in education, particularly through the teaching and dissemination of the languages of the Member States’, while fully respecting cultural and linguistic diversity (Article 165(1) TFEU). The Charter of Fundamental Rights of the EU, adopted in 2000 and made legally binding by the Treaty of Lisbon, prohibits discrimination on grounds of language (Article 21) and places an obligation on the Union to respect linguistic diversity (Article 22). The first regulation, dating from 1958, determi...

    EU language policy is based on respect for linguistic diversity in all Member States and on the creation of an intercultural dialogue throughout the EU. In order to put mutual respect into practice, the EU promotes the teaching and learning of foreign languages and the mobility of every citizen through dedicated programmes for education and vocational training. Foreign language competence is regarded as one of the basic skills that all EU citizens need to acquire in order to improve their educational and employment opportunities. In its contribution to the Social Summit held on 17 November 2017 in Gothenburg, the Commission set out the idea of a ‘European Education Area’ where by 2025, ‘in addition to one’s mother tongue, speaking two other languages has become the norm’ (COM(2017)0673). The EU also works with Member States to protect minorities, on the basis of the Council of Europe’s European Charter for Regional or Minority Languages.

    A.Policy developments and support for research on languages 1.Supporting language learning On 22 May 2019, the Council adopted a recommendation on a comprehensive approach to the teaching and learning of languages (COM(2018)0272). In its recommendation, the Council invites the Members States to bolster language learning by the end of compulsory education in order to ensure that more language teachers have the opportunity to learn abroad and to promote innovative teaching methods using tools such as the School Education Gateway and eTwinning. 2.Comparability of data on language competence In 2005, the Commission published a communication to the European Parliament and the Council on the European Indicator of Language Competence (COM(2005)0356), an instrument to measure overall language competence in each Member State. The European Union also promotes the use of the Council of Europe’s Common European Framework of Reference for Languages: Learning, teaching, assessment (CEFR). This to...

    A.Linguistic diversity As a preliminary point, it has to be noted that the European Parliament has adopted a full multilingual language policy in its own communication strategy, meaning that all EU languages are equally important. All parliamentary documents are translated into all the official languages and every Member of the European Parliament has the right to speak in the EU language of his or her choice. Similarly, visits to the House of European History and the Parlamentarium(European Parliament Visitors’ Centre) are available in the twenty-four official EU languages. Every year since 2007, the European Parliament has awarded the LUX Film Prize, which includes the subtitling of the three finalist films in the 24 official EU languages. In its resolution of 24 March 2009 on ‘Multilingualism: an asset for Europe and a shared commitment’, the European Parliament reiterated its support for EU policies in the field of multilingualism and called on the Commission to draw up measures...

  12. DocsRoom - European Commission - Choose your language

    ec.europa.eu › docsroom › documents

    MDCG 2018-7 Provisional considerations regarding the language issues associated with the UDI database (Annex VI, Part A Section 2 and Part B of the Medical Devices Regulation 2017/745 and the In-Vitro Diagnostic Medical Device Regulation 2017/745. Copy / paste the snippet below to render the highlighted section on your page.