Yahoo Web Search

  1. How Selma's 'Bloody Sunday' Became a Turning Point in the ...

    www.history.com › news › selma-bloody-sunday-attack

    Mar 06, 2015 · State troopers watch as marchers cross the Edmund Pettus Bridge over the Alabama River in Selma, Alabama as part of a civil rights march on March 9, 1965. Outrage at “Bloody Sunday” swept the ...

    • 4 min
  2. Bloody Sunday - Selma To Montgomery National Historic Trail ...

    www.nps.gov › historyculture › bloody-sunday

    Mar 20, 2020 · Marchers marching from Brown Chapel A.M.E. Church to Edmund Pettus Bridge on Sunday, March 7, 1965 (Bloody Sunday). NPS Photo. The early spring of 1965 became the turning point in the tensely-waged struggle for voting rights throughout Alabama and the “deep South.”

  3. Mar 20, 2020 · The Edmund Pettus Bridge Selma, Alabama. NPS Photo. The Edmund Pettus bridge became a symbol of the momentous changes taking place in Alabama, America, and the world. It was here that voting rights marchers were violently confronted by law enforcement personnel on March 7, 1965. The day became known as Bloody Sunday.

  4. Edmund Pettus Bridge – The City of Selma Alabama

    www.selma-al.gov › edmund-pettus-bridge

    Feb 28, 2017 · The Edmund Pettus bridge became a symbol of the momentous changes taking place in Alabama, America, and the world. It was here that voting rights marchers were violently confronted by law enforcement personnel on March 7, 1965. The day became known as Bloody Sunday. Since 1965, many marches have commemorated the events of Bloody Sunday. n March ...

  5. Civil rights protesters beaten in “Bloody Sunday” attack ...

    www.history.com › this-day-in-history › bloody

    Mar 04, 2020 · On March 7, 1965, in Selma, Alabama, a 600-person civil rights demonstration ends in violence when marchers are attacked and beaten by white state troopers and sheriff’s deputies.

  6. People also ask

    Who marched in Selma?

    What is Bloody Sunday bridge?

    What was Bloody Sunday civil rights movement?

    What was Bloody Sunday MLK?

  7. Selma to Montgomery marches - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org › wiki › Selma_to_Montgomery_marches

    Since 1965, many marches have commemorated the events of Bloody Sunday, usually held on or around the anniversary of the original event, and currently known as the Selma Bridge Crossing Jubilee. In March 1975, Coretta Scott King, the widow of Martin Luther King Jr., led four thousand marchers commemorating Bloody Sunday.

  8. The Impact of Bloody Sunday in Selma | DocsTeach

    www.docsteach.org › activities › printactivity

    3/15/1965. This newsreel reports on the impact of "Bloody Sunday," March 7, 1965, when marchers tried to cross the Edmund Pettus Bridge, just outside of Selma, Alabama, on their way to Montgomery Alabama, in demonstration for voter registration. It was a defining moment in the modern civil rights movement.

    • Push for Voting Rights Sparked Selma Protests. Before the march, civil rights groups had been pushing for equal voting rights in the city since 1963. A 1961 Civil Rights Commission report revealed that less than 1 percent of the voting-age black population was registered in Montgomery County.
    • Jimmie Lee Jackson: The Inspiration for the March. One of the first images that comes to mind when Selma is mentioned is likely Dr. Martin Luther King marching hand in hand with dozens of civil rights advocates throughout the streets.
    • The Bridge Marchers Crossed Was Named After a KKK Grand Dragon. Built in 1940, the Edmund Pettus bridge connected Selma to Montgomery. As protesters marched from one county to the other, they crossed a bridge named after Civil War Confederate general Edmund Pettus, who later became Grand Dragon of the Ku Klux Klan in Alabama.
    • Women Played an Important Role in Organizing the March. From Amelia Boynton Robinson to Marie Foster, black women played a key part in organizing the Selma march and were among the hundreds who were beaten by police.
  9. Bloody Sunday Protest March, Selma, Alabama, March 7, 1965

    www.blackpast.org › african-american-history

    Nov 24, 2007 · Bloody Sunday Protest March, Selma, Alabama, March 7, 1965. Between 1961 and 1964, the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC) had led a voting registration campaign in Selma, the seat of Dallas County, Alabama, a small town with a record of consistent resistance to black voting. When SNCC’s efforts were frustrated by stiff ...

  10. People also search for