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  1. The Role of the FDA. The FDA's job is to make sure all food -- genetically altered or not -- is safe to eat. Through the Plant Biotechnology Consultation Program, the FDA raises safety concerns ...

  2. Aug 10, 2015 · by Megan L. Norris Summary: As the prevalence of genetically modified organisms (GMOs) continues to rise, there has been an increasing public interest for information concerning the safety of these products. Concerns generally focus on how the GMO may affect the environment or how it may affect the consumer. One specific concern is the possibility for GMOs to negatively affect human health ...

  3. Mar 08, 2019 · Pros: It’s cheap in the U.S. (thanks to taxpayer subsidies) and sweet. Cons: Most of the corn used to make HFCS is genetically modified. HFCS has been linked to numerous health concerns, such as an increased risk for metabolic syndrome, obesity, liver disease, and insulin resistance leading to type 2 diabetes and cancers.

  4. Jan 22, 2020 · In 2015, 93 percent of U.S. corn and soybeans are genetically engineered, and it's estimated that 60 to 70 percent of processed foods on grocery store shelves contain genetically engineered ...

  5. en.wikipedia.org › wiki › CrossbreedCrossbreed - Wikipedia

    A crossbreed is an organism with purebred parents of two different breeds, varieties, or populations. Crossbreeding, sometimes called "designer crossbreeding", is the process of breeding such an organism, While crossbreeding is used to maintain health and viability of organisms, irresponsible crossbreeding can also produce organisms of inferior quality or dilute a purebred gene pool to the ...

  6. Jun 18, 2021 · In dog food, however, GMO ingredients can be harmful. Unfortunately, there is no way to know if the grains in your dog’s kibble are genetically modified, though we do know that over 80% of the corn and soy used in pet food and animal feed has been genetically engineered.

  7. Genentech Inc. signed an agreement from the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to further market genetically engineered human insulin. In 1982 the FDA allowed the first genetically engineered drug in the form of human insulin produced by bacteria.