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  1. Aug 04, 2009 · The Vowels: Irish has both short vowels and long vowels. The long vowels are generally indicated in writing by an acute accent. The long vowels are: í as in sí pronounced “shee”. é as in sé pronounced “shay”. ú as in tú pronounced “too”. ó as in bó pronounced “boe”. á as in tá pronounced “taw”.

  2. 2.6 The Goidelic languages. Three descendant languages of early Goidelic are spoken today and they all face significant challenges. The strongest is Irish Gaelic (Gaeilge), an official language of the Irish Republic (Éire), which was declared to be in daily use by 340,000 people in the 2002 Census, with some 1,571,000 claiming to be Irish-speaking to some degree (although many experts claim ...

  3. Project Objectives: A SummaryLearners of Irish in schools in Ireland and around the world confront a challenging spelling system that...

  4. orthography are presented. Keywords: Irish; orthography; heritage language teaching; teacher training; teaching methods; beginning readers . 1. Introduction . Despite a recent burgeoning of research interest in the literacy problems of children for whom English is an additional language (c.f. Harrison & Krol, 2007), the needs of learners

  5. Munster Irish (Irish: Gaelainn na Mumhan) is the dialect of the Irish language spoken in the province of Munster. Gaeltacht regions in Munster are found in the Gaeltachtaí of the Dingle Peninsula in west County Kerry, in the Iveragh Peninsula in south Kerry, in Cape Clear Island off the coast of west County Cork, in Muskerry West; Cúil Aodha, Ballingeary, Ballyvourney, Kilnamartyra, and ...

  6. The dialect regions of the United States are most clearly marked along the Atlantic littoral, where the earlier settlements were made. Three dialects can be defined: Northern, Midland, and Southern. Each has its subdialects. American English dialects. Map showing the dialect regions of the United States. Encyclopædia Britannica, Inc.

  7. English i e a o a u Irish i e a o u No such equivalence, however, is to be observed. What has in fact happened is that the front and back allophones of Irish /a:/ and /a/ have been elevated in Hiberno-English to phonemic status, so that the actual equivalence is as follows : English i: e: a: o: o: u: Irish i: e: [a:] [a:] o: u: a: English i e a ...

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