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  1. Aug 1, 2012 · The best preserved examples of plasterwork in the pre-Classical period are found in the monumental architecture of ancient Egypt dating from the 3rd millennium BC. Practical construction uses include the pyramids of Giza containing gypsum and lime mortars, the exteriors of which originally received smooth lime stucco.

  2. Mar 2, 2017 · Named for the huge gypsum deposits of Montmartre, plaster of Paris’ appearance as a sculptural medium dates to Mesopotamia, when classical statues were draped in fringed gypsum skirts and dresses. From the Tigris and Euphrates the material made its way into Western European history through architectural details, columns, pilasters, and mouldings.

    • Carl Dellatore
  3. plaster. plaster of paris, quick-setting gypsum plaster consisting of a fine white powder (calcium sulfate hemihydrate), which hardens when moistened and allowed to dry. Known since ancient times, plaster of paris is so called because of its preparation from the abundant gypsum found near Paris. Plaster of paris does not generally shrink or ...

    • The Editors of Encyclopaedia Britannica
  4. Feb 18, 2024 · Plaster of Paris, also known as gypsum plaster, has a rich history and a wide range of applications. It has been used for centuries as a casting material for sculpting and creating orthopedic casts. Its use in art and craft projects is also well-known. Plaster of Paris is valued for its unique material properties, including its ability to harden quickly when mixed with water. It is a versatile ...

  5. Oct 5, 2023 · Plaster is a mixture of lime, sand or cement, and water that hardens as it dries. It’s used as an inexpensive building material for decorative features on walls and ceilings, as a fast-drying agent for children’s art projects, and for medical casts to set bones. For centuries, sculptors have also used plaster as a procedural material for ...

  6. Jan 15, 2020 · Art Nouveau (1890-1914) Plaster, back-lit glass, and trompe l'oiel paint comprise the three most popular ceiling finishing techniques of the Art Nouveau movement. Plaster was used to create decorative three-dimensional patterns around the edge of a ceiling, with trompe l'oiel often used to complement these three-dimensional patterns.

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  8. Aug 4, 2011 · August 04, 2011 By The Victorian Emporium. Decorative plaster mouldings and wooden mouldings originate from the Classical Order, one of the ancient styles of classical architecture, each having its own proportions, profiles and details and recognizable by the type of column used. From the 16th century, 5 distinct orders were recognized whose ...

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