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  2. In 1649 Maryland passed the Maryland Toleration Act, also known as the Act Concerning Religion, a law mandating religious tolerance for trinitarian Christians. Passed on 21 September 1649 by the assembly of the Maryland Colony, it was the first law requiring religious tolerance in the English North American colonies.

  3. 1975 - Independence is granted to the Dutch colony of Surinam. 1980 - Beatrix becomes queen when Queen Juliana abdicates her throne. 1995 - A great flood causes a state of emergency and hundreds of thousands of people are evacuated. 1997 - The Delta Works are completed. 2002 - The Euro replaces the Dutch guilder as the official currency.

  4. Apr 26, 2013 · 2nd Lord Baltimore, led first expedition that established Colony of Maryland Leonard Calvert (1610-1647) England: bef. 1632: Maryland Colony: Served as 1st Colonial Governor of Maryland bet. 1634-1647, brother of Cecilius Calvert, above. Gov. Thomas Greene (c1610-1650) England: 1634: Maryland Colony: Served as 2nd Colonial Governor of Maryland ...

  5. By 1650, however, England had established a dominant presence on the Atlantic coast. The first colony was founded at Jamestown, Virginia, in 1607. Many of the people who settled in the New World came to escape religious persecution. The Pilgrims, founders of Plymouth, Massachusetts, arrived in 1620.

  6. Cæcilius Calvert, 2nd Baron Baltimore, first proprietor of the Maryland colony: 805,029: 682 sq mi (1,766 km 2) Baltimore City: 510: Baltimore City: 1851: Founded in 1729. Detached in 1851 from Baltimore County: Cæcilius Calvert, 2nd Baron Baltimore, first proprietor of the Maryland colony: 620,961: 92 sq mi (238 km 2) Calvert County: 009 ...

  7. Sep 03, 2018 · Cecil was born in 1605 and died in 1675. When Cecil, second Lord Baltimore, founded the colony of Maryland, he expanded on his father's ideas of freedom of religion and separation of church and state. In 1649, Maryland passed the Maryland Toleration Act, also known as the "Act Concerning Religion."

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