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  1. of, belonging to, or associated with you your nose; your house; your first taste of freedom belonging to or associated with an unspecified person or people in generalthe path is on your left heading north; this lotion is for your head only informal used to indicate all things or people of a certain typeyour part-time worker is a problem

  2. your pronoun (BELONGING TO YOU) belonging to or connected with the person or people being spoken to; the possessive form of you: Is this your umbrella? Let’s take your car because it has more room than mine. your pronoun (OF PEOPLE GENERALLY) belonging to or connected with any person or people generally: Exercise is good for your health. Idiom

  3. your pronoun (BELONGING TO YOU) belonging to or connected with the person or people being spoken to; the possessive form of you: Is this your umbrella? Let’s take your car because it has more room than mine. your pronoun (OF PEOPLE GENERALLY) belonging to or connected with any person or people generally: Exercise is good for your health. Idiom

  4. Your "Your" is a possessive determiner. (Other possessive determiners are "my," "your," "his," "her," "its," "our," and "their.") "Your" is used before a word one of three reasons: (1) To show it belongs to "you." For example: your car, your arm, your dog (2) To show it is of "you." For example: your picture, your photograph, your portrait

  5. you. Sometimes, you is used where the word your could also be used, such as in sentences like this: I hadn’t heard about you getting lost. Historically, it was considered more proper to use your before gerunds (for example, getting in the preceding example), but using you is now more common and often sounds more natural.

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  7. Pronouns: possessive ( my, mine, your, yours, etc.) We use pronouns to refer to possession and ‘belonging’. There are two types: possessive pronouns and possessive determiners. We use possessive determiners before a noun. We use possessive pronouns in place of a noun: …. (Traducción de your del Cambridge English-Spanish Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)