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  1. Died November 24, 2019, age 28; method not disclosed Was a Korean actress and K-pop star and member of the group HARA She had attempted suicide 6 months earlier, but was resuscitated after being found unconscious She had been assaulted by her boyfriend the previous year and he was subsequently sentenced to 3 years in prison. The public breakup ...

  2. Netflix's hit series La Casa de Papel, which is also known as Money Heist will be returned with season 5 this year!Who is your favorite Money Heist character...

    • Early Life and Crimes
    • Murder of Eight Student Nurses
    • Pre-Trial
    • Confessions
    • Trial
    • XYY Syndrome Myth
    • Death Penalty Reversal
    • Life in Prison
    • Death
    • in Media

    Childhood

    Richard Benjamin Speck was born in Kirkwood, Illinois, the seventh of eight children of Benjamin Franklin Speck and Mary Margaret Carbaugh. The family moved to Monmouth, Illinois, shortly after Speck's birth. Speck and his younger sister Carolyn (b. 1943) were much younger than their four older sisters and two older brothers. Speck's eldest brother, Robert, died at the age of 23 in an automobile accident in 1952. Speck's father worked as a packer at Western Stoneware in Monmouth and had previ...

    Dallas, 1951–1966

    After a year in Santo, Speck moved with his mother, stepfather, and sister Carolyn to the East Dallas section of Dallas, Texas, living at 10 addresses in poor neighborhoods over the next dozen years. Speck loathed his often drunk and frequently absent stepfather, who psychologically abused him with insults and threats. Speck, a poor student who needed glasses for reading but refused to wear them, struggled through Dallas public schools from fourth through eighth grade, repeating the eighth gr...

    Monmouth, March–April 1966

    Speck stayed with his sister Martha Thornton and her family in Chicago for a few days, and then returned to his boyhood hometown of Monmouth, Illinois, where he initially stayed with some old family friends. Speck's brother Howard was a carpenter in Monmouth and found a job for him sanding plasterboard for another Monmouth carpenter. Speck became angry when he learned his ex-wife had remarried two days after she was granted a divorce on March 16, 1966. He moved to the Christy Hotel in downtow...

    At 11 p.m. on July 13, 1966, Speck broke into the 2319 E. 100th St townhouse in Chicago's Jeffery Manor neighborhood; the townhouse was functioning as a dormitory for student nurses. He entered and, using only a knife, killed Gloria Davy, Patricia Matusek, Nina Jo Schmale, Pamela Wilkening, Suzanne Farris, Mary Ann Jordan, Merlita Gargullo, and Valentina Pasion. Speck, who later claimed he was both drunk and high on drugs, may have originally planned to commit a routine burglary.Speck held the women in a room for hours, leading them out one by one, stabbing or strangling each to death, then finally raping and strangling his last victim, Gloria Davy. One woman, Corazon Amurao, escaped death because she crawled and hid under a bed while Speck was out of the room. Speck possibly lost count or might have known eight women lived in the townhouse but was unaware that a ninth woman was spending the night. Amurao stayed hidden until almost 6 a.m. Fingerprints found at the scene were matched...

    Felony Court Judge Herbert J. Paschen appointed an impartial panel to report on Speck's competence to stand trial and his sanity at the time of the crime—a panel of three physicians suggested by the defense and three physicians selected by the prosecution, consisting of five psychiatrists and one general surgeon. The panel's confidential report deemed Speck competent to stand trial and concluded he had not been insane at the time of the murders. While awaiting trial, Speck participated in twice-weekly sessions with part-time Cook County Jail psychiatrist, Dr. Marvin Ziporyn. These continued after Speck's transfer from Cermak Memorial Hospital (inside Chicago's House of Corrections) on July 29, 1966, until February 13, 1967, the day before Speck was transferred to Peoria to stand trial. Ziporyn prepared a discharge summary with depression, anxiety, guilt, and shame among Speck's emotions, but also a deep love for his family. It went on to note an obsessive-compulsive personality and...

    Speck later claimed he had no recollection of the murders, but he had confessed the crime to Dr. LeRoy Smith at the Cook County Hospital. Smith did not testify, because the confession was made while Speck was sedated. Illinois Supreme Court Justice John J. Stamos, Cook County's state attorney when Speck was tried, who knew of the hospital confession, stated, "...we didn't need it. We had an eyewitness." Speck confessed to the murders for the first time in public when he spoke to Chicago Tribune columnist Bob Greene in 1978.In a film that inmates made at the Stateville Correctional Center in 1988, Speck recounted the brutal murders in detail. He again stated he was high that night, but then he undercut the idea that the drugs were a mitigating factor, asserting he could just as well have "done it sober".

    Speck's jury trial began April 3, 1967, in Peoria, Illinois, three hours southwest of Chicago, with a gag order on the press.In court, Speck was positively identified by the sole surviving student nurse, Corazon Amurao. When Amurao was asked if she could identify the killer of her fellow students, Amurao rose from her seat in the witness box, walked directly in front of Speck and pointed her finger at him, nearly touching him, and said, "This is the man." Lieutenant Emil Giese testified regarding the fingerprintsthat were matched. On April 15, after 49 minutes of deliberation, the jury found Speck guilty and recommended the death penalty. On June 5, Judge Herbert J. Paschen sentenced Speck to die in the electric chair, but granted an immediate stay pending automatic appeal. The Illinois Supreme Courtsubsequently upheld his conviction and death sentence on November 22, 1968.

    In December 1965 and March 1966, Nature and The Lancet published findings by British cytogeneticist Patricia Jacobs and colleagues of a chromosome survey of patients at Scotland's only security hospital for the developmentally disabled. Nine of the patients, ranging from 5 ft 7 in (1.70 m) to 6 ft 2 in (1.88 m) height, were found to have an extra Y chromosome, the XYY syndrome. Jacobs' hypothesis, that men with XYY syndrome are more prone to aggressive and violent behavior than males with the normal XY karyotype, was later shown to be incorrect. In August 1966, Eric Engel, a Swiss endocrinologist and geneticist at Vanderbilt University in Nashville, Tennessee, wrote to Speck's attorney, Cook County Public Defender Gerald W. Getty, who was reportedly planning an insanity defense. He suggested, based on Jacobs' unsubstantiated theory and Speck's height of 6 ft 1 in (1.85 m), that Speck might have XYY syndrome. A chromosome analysis performed the following month by Engel revealed that...

    On June 28, 1971, the U.S. Supreme Court (citing their June 3, 1968 Witherspoon v. Illinois decision) upheld Speck's conviction but reversed his death sentence, because more than 250 potential jurors were unconstitutionally excluded from his jury because of their conscientious or religious beliefs against capital punishment.The case was remanded back to the Illinois Supreme Court for re-sentencing. On June 29, 1972, in Furman v. Georgia, the U.S. Supreme Court declared the death penalty unconstitutional, so the Illinois Supreme Court's only option was to order Speck re-sentenced to prison by the original Cook Countycourt. On November 21, 1972, in Peoria, Judge Richard Fitzgerald re-sentenced Speck to from 400 to 1,200 years in prison (eight consecutive sentences of 50 to 150 years).He was denied parole in seven minutes at his first parole hearing on September 15, 1976, and at six subsequent hearings in 1977, 1978, 1981, 1984, 1987, and 1990.

    While incarcerated at the Stateville Correctional Center in Crest Hill, Illinois, Speck was given the nickname "Birdman" after the film Birdman of Alcatraz, because he kept a pair of sparrows that had flown into his cell. He was described as a loner who kept a stamp collection and enjoyed listening to music. His contacts with the warden included requests for new shirts, a radio, and other mundane items. The warden merely described him as "a big nothing doing time." Speck was not a model prisoner; he was often caught with drugs or distilled moonshine. Punishment for such infractions never stopped him. "How am I going to get in trouble? I'm here for 1,200 years!" Speck loathed reporters, and granted only one press interview, in 1978, to Chicago Tribune columnist Bob Greene. During that interview, he publicly confessed to the murders for the first time, and said he thought he would get out of prison "between now and the year 2000," at which time he hoped to run his own grocery store bu...

    Shortly before December 5, 1991, Speck was transported from Stateville Correctional Center to Silver Cross Hospital in Joliet, Illinois after complaining of severe chest pains late Wednesday evening. Speck later died in the early morning hours of December 5, of what was believed to be a heart attack, one day shy of what would have been his 50th birthday. The coroner stated that Speck had an "enlarged heart, emphysema and clogged arteries" which most likely contributed to his fatal heart attack. Speck's sister feared that his grave would be desecrated, so he does not have a physical resting place. Speck was cremated, and his ashes were scattered in a secret location in the Joliet area.

    In films

    1. Japanese "pink film" director Kōji Wakamatsu based his 1967 film, Violated Angels (犯された白衣 - Okasareta Hakui) on the Speck murders. 2. The 1974 film Female Trouble, written and directed by John Waters, references Speck when Dawn Davenport (played by Divine) includes "I blew Richard Speck!" in her litany of crimes.[citation needed] 3. The 1976 film Naked Massacre is a fictionalized version of Speck's murder spree, set in Northern Ireland.[citation needed] 4. The 1983 Charles Bronson vigilant...

    In television

    1. The story of the investigation of Townhouse Massacre, the arrest, and trial of Speck was featured in an episode of Investigation Discovery's A Crime to Rememberentitled, "And Then There Was One". 2. In season 1, episode 2 of FX's American Horror Story, two young nurses are held hostage and killed by a home invader in 1968. Show creator Ryan Murphyhas said that the storyline was inspired by Speck's murders. 3. Law & Orderepisode "Vengeance" 2.16 has Assistant District Attorney Benjamin Ston...

    In music

    1. A report of Speck's grand jury indictment is among the news bulletins read in "7 O'Clock News/Silent Night", a song from Simon and Garfunkel's 1966 album Parsley, Sage, Rosemary, and Thyme. 2. Cheap Trick's 1977 self-titled debut album contains a song about Speck called "The Ballad of TV Violence (I'm Not the Only Boy)." The song was originally titled "The Ballad of Richard Speck," but according to drummer Bun E. Carlos, "[T]he legal department said we could call it that if we wanted, but...

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  3. en.wikipedia.org › wiki › Ramzi_YousefRamzi Yousef - Wikipedia

    Ramzi Yousef (Urdu: رمزي احمد يوسف ‎, romanized: Ramzī Yūsuf; born 20 May 1967 or 27 April 1968) is a Pakistani convicted terrorist who was one of the main perpetrators of the 1993 World Trade Center bombing and the bombing of Philippine Airlines Flight 434; he was also a co-conspirator in the Bojinka plot.

  4. Jun 27, 2021 · Tracing the evolution of "The Fast and the Furious" franchise, movie by movie. At least five people, including a 4-year-old, were shot outside of an Indianapolis funeral home. Trump is owed a $1 ...

  5. Jan 07, 2019 · Kin Apr 08 2019 2:12 am to sf, 'Kill it' about revenge from the Avengers. a young killer want to find out his past, so He killed all people who is connected to his past, He knew from Pavel. He want to know the true, who is his family and why from the pictures that He had from Pavel.

  6. May 07, 2021 · Today is Friday, May 7, the 127th day of 2021. There are 238 days left in the year. Today's Highlight in History: On May 7, 1945, Germany signed an unconditional surrender at Allied headquarters in...

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