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  1. The history of Scandinavia is the history of the geographical region of Scandinavia and its peoples. The region is located in Northern Europe, and consists of Denmark, Norway and Sweden. Finland and Iceland are at times, especially in English-speaking contexts, considered part of Scandinavia. Contents 1 Pre-historic age 1.1 Stone Age

    • Scandinavia’s Early History
    • Population Density of Scandinavian Countries
    • Norway
    • Finland
    • Sweden
    • Denmark
    • Population Growth of Scandinavia

    Historically, Europeans from the south settled Scandinavia, like various German people groups and their ancestors. These early visitors did not travel into the far north of Scandinavia, in part, because there were indigenous people who saw them as a threat to their way of life. They first settled in Denmark and southern Norway and Sweden. Meanwhile...

    Population density is a measurement that counts the number of people living in each unit of area, such as a square mile or square kilometer. All countries in the world can be measured with regard to their population density. 1. On one end of the population-density spectrum, are countries like Monaco, which has over 49,000+ people per square mile or...

    Norway is also among the top 25 least-populated countries. It is 125,000+ square miles or 323,782 square kilometers. It’s population is 5,300,000+. Its population density is 41 people per square miles or 16 people per square kilometer. What about the future? “A growth of immigration has also helped to swell numbers however and the CIA World Factboo...

    Finland is similar to Norway. Finland is 130,000+ square miles or 338,000+ square kilometers. It’s population is 5,500,000+. Its population density is 41 people per square mile or 16 people per square mile. What about the future? “Current projections believe that the growth rate will get down to 0.10% by 2050 and that the population of Finland will...

    Sweden is in the top 50 according to most measurements. Sweden is 173,000+ square miles or 450,000+ square kilometers. It’s population is 10,300,00+ people. Its population density is 60 people per square mile or 23 people per square kilometer. What about the future? “The slow annual growth rate in Sweden is expected to continue slowing but at a ver...

    Denmark is the most densely-populated Scandinavian country. It is closer to the most-populated end of the spectrum than the least populated end. The reasons for this are mostly historical. Early settlers found the resources they needed in the land of Denmark and did not have a need to travel north, where obstacles awaited them. Depending on how the...

    The population of Northern Europe is growing, numbering approximately 27 million people today. Norway leads the way with 12.3% growth. Iceland is second with 10% growth. Sweden is third with 9.7% growth. By 2030, the population of Scandinavia is expected to reach 30 million people. The growth is characterized by multiple factors: 1. Immigration:Sca...

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  3. Sep 16, 2020 · 'Many Vikings have high levels of non-Scandinavian ancestry, both within and outside Scandinavia, which suggest ongoing gene flow across Europe.' As a result of this plentiful passing of genes, the...

  4. Aug 03, 2020 · It’s clear that the Scandinavian people share a high, productive work ethic. It’s impossible to put this down to simple genetics. It could well be that this is fostered by the system that made them. Proponents of the Nordic Model would argue that productivity and economic growth are not necessarily the be all and end all of society.

  5. Aug 23, 2020 · Myrdal’s egalitarian views were typical of Scandinavian intellectuals, even though race relations were, for them, strictly an abstraction. There were essentially no non-Europeans in Scandinavia until the 1970s, and, as Tage Erlander’s 1965 comments show, there was a certain commonsense understanding of the consequences of immigration.

  6. Sep 24, 2021 · One of the most recent trends that involved Scandinavian DNA moving about Europe was the immigration of as many as 80,000 Norwegians to the Netherlands in the 1600 and 1700s. Many of the young male immigrants ended up working as sailors in the Navy, or on merchant ships. The young women often found employment as domestic servants.