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  1. The Walter Reed Army Medical Center (WRAMC) – known as Walter Reed General Hospital (WRGH) until 1951 – was the U.S. Army's flagship medical center from 1909 to 2011. Located on 113 acres (46 ha) in the District of Columbia , it served more than 150,000 active and retired personnel from all branches of the military.

    • United States
    • May 1, 1909
  2. The Walter Reed National Military Medical Center (WRNMMC), formerly known as the National Naval Medical Center and colloquially referred to as the Bethesda Naval Hospital, Walter Reed, or Navy Med, is a United States' tri-service military medical center, located in the community of Bethesda, Maryland, near the headquarters of the National Institutes of Health.

    • Tricare
    • 8901 Rockville Pike, Bethesda, Maryland, United States
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  4. As the nation continues to battle the COVID-19 pandemic and increasing cases because of the Omicron variant, Walter Reed National Military Medical Center (WRNMMC) is supporting President Joe Biden’s mobilization of 1,000 service members to assist in locations nationwide where hospitals have been overwhelmed due to staffing shortages.

  5. Jan 14, 2020 · 6900 Georgia Ave NW, Washington, DC 20307. Heritage designation. National Register of Historic Places listed place (NRHP district, Walter Reed Army Medical Center (WRAMC) Historic District, 2015–) Inception. 1909. Dissolved, abolished or demolished date. 27 August 2011. Elevation above sea level. 279 ft.

  6. Dr. Thomas Ableman is an ophthalmologist in Bethesda, MD, and is affiliated with Walter Reed National Military Medical Center. He has been in practice between 10–20 years.

  7. The Walter Reed Hospital, Washington, D.C., was named in his honour. Reed was the youngest of five children of Lemuel Sutton Reed, a Methodist minister, and his first wife, Pharaba White. In 1866 the family moved to Charlottesville, where Walter intended to study classics at the University of Virginia .

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