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  1. Philip IV (April–June 1268 – 29 November 1314), called Philip the Fair (French: Philippe le Bel), was King of France from 1285 to 1314. By virtue of his marriage with Joan I of Navarre , he was also King of Navarre as Philip I from 1284 to 1305, as well as Count of Champagne .

  2. Philip's father Charles, Count of Valois, the younger brother of King Philip IV of France, had striven throughout his life to gain the throne for himself but was never successful. He died in 1325, leaving his eldest son Philip as heir to the counties of Anjou , Maine , and Valois .

  3. Philip II (21 August 1165 – 14 July 1223), byname Philip Augustus (French: Philippe Auguste), was King of France from 1180 to 1223. His predecessors had been known as kings of the Franks , but from 1190 onward, Philip became the first French monarch to style himself "King of France" ( Latin : rex Francie ).

  4. Philip IV was born in the Royal Palace of Valladolid, and was the eldest son of Philip III and his wife, Margaret of Austria. In 1615, at the age of 10, Philip was married to 13-year-old Elisabeth of France .

  5. Isabella of France (c. 1295 – 22 August 1358), sometimes described as the She-Wolf of France (French: Louve de France), was Queen of England as the wife of King Edward II, and regent of England from 1327 until 1330. She was the youngest surviving child and only surviving daughter of Philip IV of France and Joan I of Navarre. Isabella was ...

  6. The Capetian dynasty (/ k ə ˈ p iː ʃ ən /; French: Capétiens), also known as the House of France, is a dynasty of Frankish origin, and a branch of the Robertians.It is among the largest and oldest royal houses in Europe and the world, and consists of Hugh Capet, the founder of the dynasty, and his male-line descendants, who ruled in France without interruption from 987 to 1792, and again ...

  7. Philip claimed descent from Constantine I and Charlemagne, justifying his intervention in French Wars of Religion and his continuing efforts to depose Henry IV of France. [18] Philip signed the Treaty of Vaucelles with Henry II of France in 1556.

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