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  1. Rock·y Moun·tain spot·ted fe·ver

    /ˈräkē ˈmount(ə)n spädəd ˈfēvər/

    noun

    • 1. a rickettsial disease transmitted by ticks.
      • Rocky Mountain spotted fever ( RMSF) is a bacterial infection. The illness can be very severe and typically requires hospital care. Rocky Mountain spotted fever is a seasonal disease, occurring during the months of April through September in the U.S.
      www.medicinenet.com/rocky_mountain_spotted_fever_symptoms_and_signs/symptoms.htm#:~:text=Rocky%20Mountain%20spotted%20fever%20%28%20RMSF%29%20is%20a,months%20of%20April%20through%20September%20in%20the%20U.S.
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  3. Rocky Mountain spotted fever - Symptoms and causes - Mayo Clinic

    www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/rocky...
    • Overview
    • Symptoms
    • Causes
    • Risk Factors
    • Complications
    • Prevention

    Rocky Mountain spotted fever is a bacterial infection transmitted by a tick. Without prompt treatment, Rocky Mountain spotted fever can cause serious damage to internal organs, such as your kidneys and heart.Although it was first identified in the Rocky Mountains, Rocky Mountain spotted fever is most commonly found in the southeastern part of the United States. It also occurs in parts of Canada, Mexico, Central America and South America.Early signs and symptoms of Rocky Mountain spotted fever...

    Although many people become ill within the first week after infection, signs and symptoms may not appear for up to 14 days. Initial signs and symptoms of Rocky Mountain spotted fever often are nonspecific and can mimic those of other illnesses: 1. High fever 2. Chills 3. Severe headache 4. Muscle aches 5. Nausea and vomiting 6. Confusion or other neurological changes

    Rocky Mountain spotted fever is caused by infection with the organism Rickettsia rickettsii. Ticks carrying R. rickettsii are the most common source of infection.If an infected tick attaches itself to your skin and feeds on your blood for six to 10 hours, you may pick up the infection. But you may never see the tick on you.Rocky Mountain spotted fever primarily occurs when ticks are most active and during warm weather when people tend to spend more time outdoors. Rocky Mountain spotted fever...

    Factors that may increase your risk of contracting Rocky Mountain spotted fever include: 1. Living in an area where the disease is common 2. The time of year — infections are more common in the spring and early summer 3. How much time you spend in grassy or wooded areas 4. Whether you have a dog or spend time with dogsIf an infected tick attaches to your skin, you can contract Rocky Mountain spotted fever when you remove it, as fluid from the tick can enter your body through an opening such a...

    Rocky Mountain spotted fever damages the lining of your smallest blood vessels, causing the vessels to leak or form clots. This may cause: 1. Inflammation of the brain (encephalitis). In addition to severe headaches, Rocky Mountain spotted fever can cause inflammation of the brain, which can cause confusion, seizures and delirium. 2. Inflammation of the heart or lungs. Rocky Mountain spotted fever can cause inflammation in areas of the heart and lungs. This can lead to heart failure or lung f...

    You can decrease your chances of contracting Rocky Mountain spotted fever by taking some simple precautions: 1. Wear long pants and sleeves. When walking in wooded or grassy areas, wear shoes, long pants tucked into socks and long-sleeved shirts. Try to stick to trails and avoid walking through low bushes and long grass. 2. Use insect repellents. Products containing DEET (Off! Deep Woods, Repel) often repel ticks. Be sure to follow the instructions on the label. Clothing that has permethrin i...

  4. May 07, 2019 · Rocky Mountain spotted fever (RMSF) is a bacterial disease spread through the bite of an infected tick. Most people who get sick with RMSF will have a fever, headache, and rash. RMSF can be deadly if not treated early with the right antibiotic.

  5. Rocky Mountain spotted fever - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rocky_Mountain_spotted_fever

    Rocky Mountain spotted fever (RMSF) is a bacterial disease spread by ticks. It typically begins with a fever and headache , which is followed a few days later with the development of a rash . [3] The rash is generally made up of small spots of bleeding and starts on the wrists and ankles. [10]

    • 2 to 14 days after infection
    • Early: Fever, headache, Later: Rash
  6. Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever: Pictures and Long-Term Effects

    www.healthline.com/.../rocky-mountain-spotted-fever

    Aug 28, 2018 · Rocky Mountain spotted fever (RMSF) is a bacterial infection spread by a bite from an infected tick. It causes vomiting, a sudden high fever around 102 or 103°F, headache, abdominal pain, rash ...

    • Jacquelyn Cafasso
  7. Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever Facts and Symptoms

    www.verywellhealth.com/rocky-mountain-spotted...
    • Basic Facts
    • Symptoms
    • What The Rash Looks Like
    • How Serious Is It?
    • How It's Diagnosed
    • Treatment
    • Prevention

    After an infected tick bites a human, the bacteria are released into the bloodstream. There they attack cells that line the blood vessels and smooth muscles that control the constriction of the blood vessel. They set off an immune reaction in the blood vessel causing the vessel to swell and become leaky. This process can occur in any organ system in the body causing a wide variety of symptoms.

    The incubation period is 2 to 14 days after the tick bite. The average incubation period is 7 days. The most common symptoms of Rocky Mountain spotted fever are the abrupt onset of fever, severe headache, muscle aches, and vomiting. Other symptoms that are less common are abdominal pain, swollen lymph nodes, cough, stiff neck, confusion, and coma.

    The rash associated with Rocky Mountain spotted fever usually starts around 4 days into the illness. It looks like small, red, flat spots starting most often on the ankles and wrists, and then moving to the palms, soles, and trunk. As the rash progresses, it becomes bumpier. Approximately 10% of those infected never get a rash.

    Overall, Rocky Mountain spotted fever is fatal in 3% to 7% of cases. However, it is fatal in over 30% of those who are not treated. The mortality is higher in people over 40 years of age. Death usually results from shock and kidney failure.

    Rocky Mountain spotted fever is diagnosed mainly based on symptoms. There are no reliable laboratory tests to diagnose Rocky Mountain spotted fever while the patient has the disease. Most laboratory tests that are specific for the bacteria involve obtaining one blood test while the patient is sick and another in 4 weeks to see if the immune system has built up antibodies to the bacteria. Obviously, waiting for this second test to return before making a diagnosis is fruitless and only useful in retrospect. Other lab tests that may indicate Rocky Mountain spotted fever are a low white blood cell count, low platelet count, or elevated liver function tests. The rash is usually the key to diagnosis since not many rashes affect the palms and soles.

    Rocky Mountain spotted fever is treated with antibioticssuch as doxycycline, tetracycline, or chloramphenicol. Most providers will prescribe one of these antibiotics on the assumption that the disease is Rocky Mountain spotted fever and confirm the diagnosis with another blood test in 4 weeks. Pregnant women should not take doxycycline or tetracycline. Since chloramphenicol is available in the US only in IV form, pregnant women should be admitted to the hospital.

    Preventing Rocky Mountain spotted fever involves preventing tick bites. Children and adults who are outside in tick-infested areas should wear long clothing and tuck the end of the pants into the socks. Insect repellant should be applied to shoes and socks. Permethrin products are more effective against ticks than DEET products. Check for ticks attached to the skin every 2-3 hours while outside, then check thoroughly once a day. Favorite hiding places for ticks are in the hair so check the scalp, neck, armpits, and groin.

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    • Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever: Rickettsia rickettsii
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  8. Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever | Johns Hopkins Medicine

    www.hopkinsmedicine.org/health/conditions-and...

    Rocky Mountain spotted fever (RMSF) is an infection caused by the bite of an infected tick. It affects over 2,000 people a year in the U.S. and usually occurs from April until September. But, it can occur anytime during the year where the weather is warm.

  9. Rocky Mountain spotted fever - Diagnosis and treatment - Mayo ...

    www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/rocky...
    • Diagnosis
    • Treatment
    • Preparing For Your Appointment

    Rocky Mountain spotted fever can be difficult to diagnose because the early signs and symptoms are similar to those caused by many other diseases.Laboratory tests can check a blood sample, rash specimen or the tick itself for evidence of the organism that causes the infection. Because early treatment with antibiotics is so important, doctors don't wait for these test results before starting treatment if Rocky Mountain fever is strongly suspected.

    People who develop Rocky Mountain spotted fever are much more likely to avoid complications if treated within five days of developing symptoms. That's why your doctor will probably have you begin antibiotic therapy before receiving conclusive test results.Doxycycline (Monodox, Vibramycin, others) is the most effective treatment for Rocky Mountain spotted fever, but it's not a good choice if you're pregnant. In that case, your doctor may prescribe chloramphenicol as an alternative.

    You'll likely start by seeing your family doctor. In some cases, you might be referred to a doctor who specializes in infectious diseases.

  10. Picture of Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever - WebMD

    www.webmd.com/skin-problems-and-treatments/...

    Rocky Mountain spotted fever. This disease is caused by Rickettsia rickettsii and is transmitted by a number of different ticks. Despite its geographical title, Rocky Mountain spotted fever is ...

  11. Rocky Mountain spotted fever (RMSF) is a bacterial disease spread through the bite on an infected tick.

  12. Spotted fever - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Spotted_fever

    A spotted fever is a type of tick-borne disease which presents on the skin. They are all caused by bacteria of the genus Rickettsia. Typhus is a group of similar diseases also caused by Rickettsia bacteria, but spotted fevers and typhus are different clinical entities.Transmission process: When the tick latches on, it needs to be removed under 2 hours.